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Question
Posted by: Sandy | 2010/08/12

Hip Dysplasia

I have a 5yr old Border Collie with hip dysplasia (not 2 sure bout the spelling). We are giving him Rimadyl. What I would like to know is if you could tell me, or lead me to a site that I can learn how to massage his leg, or hip, and I''ve noticed his back is also affected. I don''t have the cash to let him have the op, and I really regret it. The vet has told us to let him rather have quality of life, hence the pills, But I wud like to be able to do the " physio therapy"  on him to give him xtra relief. Please your help would be appreciated.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Hi Sandy

I have looked on the internet and unable to find an article explaining the physiotherapy techniques required. There are a couple of books available through Amazon that may assist - for example: Animal physiotherapy: assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of animals.

Swimming may help in assisting to prevent muscle atrophy of the hind legs. You should also consider Glucosamine supplements.

As you know surgery is the ideal solution - try and discuss a payment plan with your vet an pay him over the year. Alternatively, seek the help from a welfare society and give a generous donation.

I hope this helps

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Sandy | 2010/08/15

Wow, Cybervet, Chill and Ruby, tnx for all that. The advice you gave really gave me lots of options to look into, and helps me tremendously. My dog is very energetic, as a Border Collie can be. He does however show pain at night, when it''s cool outside. We have tried the heated blanket, and the magnetic collar. Did not work. Coincidentally, I do give him the cartilage. Did not even think it wud help. We also keep him trim and fit. Tnx again.

Reply to Sandy
Posted by: Ruby | 2010/08/13

They diagnosed this in our golden retriever when she was still a puppy (we had her scanned as it''s common in the breed). We were given the option of haviong the op (I believe they remove the head of the femur - ?).
Anyway, the other option was to ensure she keeps her weight down &  we give her plenty exercise to keep her muscles strong and healthy - which we have done faithfully. We also give her cod liver oil &  glucosamine. She is now almost 11 yeasr old and only now starting to show a few signs of problems - a bit of limping if she overdoes it. We then just give her Rimadyl that the vet prescribed. She is always happy &  energetic and eats her food so she doesn''t seem to be suffering in any way under normal circumstances - just occasionally.

So, it is possible to manage this without surgery, but I guess each case is different.

Just to give you a different perspective.

Reply to Ruby
Posted by: Chill | 2010/08/12

Massage might help the dog''s muscles, but the real problem with hip dysplasia lies within the joint itself - the head of the femur doesn''t fit properly into the hip bone, and this causes abnormal wear and tear on the cartilage. Once this is worn away, and you get bone rubbing against bone, that''s where most of the pain and discomfort comes from.

As the cvet says - a glucosamine/chondroitin supplement is a good idea. You can use human ones, or you can see about getting some flex-c-joint and flex-o-joint - these are powder supplements made for horses, which can also be used for dogs (in much smaller quantities, of course) and work out a lot cheaper than the other versions of the supplement. Google the two names to get contact details, or ask at a horse-supply place, if you have one near you. (I think they are made by Endeavon, or something).

Also, feed the dog cartilage - all the end bits of chicken bones, etc, and the chewy ends of spare ribs, etc - you could even ask at the butcher''s.

Reply to Chill
Posted by: Cybervet | 2010/08/12

Hi Sandy

I have looked on the internet and unable to find an article explaining the physiotherapy techniques required. There are a couple of books available through Amazon that may assist - for example: Animal physiotherapy: assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of animals.

Swimming may help in assisting to prevent muscle atrophy of the hind legs. You should also consider Glucosamine supplements.

As you know surgery is the ideal solution - try and discuss a payment plan with your vet an pay him over the year. Alternatively, seek the help from a welfare society and give a generous donation.

I hope this helps

Reply to Cybervet

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