Posted by: wayne | 2013-01-11

hip displasia

i have a boerbul pup that is a year and a half almost and have noticed that she has hip displasia, is it ok for her to have puppies or not and what should i do about her condition/ it is not very bad but it is easly noticeable

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Our expert says:
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Hip dysplasia is a developmental, multifactorial, genetically influenced condition that is characterized by ill-fitting or loosely-fitting hip joints and the development of secondary degenerative joint disease (arthrosis).

As hip dysplasia is a developmental disease, it only manifests itself radiologically after the age of about 6 months. There is no doubt about the fact that the tendency to develop hip dysplasia is inherited but environmental factors like excessive protein intake and excessive strenuous exercise at a very young age play a role in the degree of dysplasia that is eventually manifested. Genetically susceptible dogs become dysplastic when the primary muscle mass that supports the joint fails to mature at the same rate as the skeletal structures. The resultant disparity between soft tissue strength and biomechanical forces during skeletal growth is manifested as a loss of congruency between the articular surfaces of the acetabulum and the femur head. This results in joint laxity and eventual hip arthrosis.

The SAVA in conjunction with KUSA runs a certification scheme for hip and elbow dysplasia. Radiographs are made by your veterinarian and sent to a SAVA/KUSA approved veterinary radiologists for certification. More information is available on the KUSA website at and a hip dysplasia power point can be down loaded from the SA Veterinary Foundation website at

Alternatively, visit the website of the SAVA ( and click on the Hip Displasia in the Menu.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

Our users say:
Posted by: George | 2013-01-14

Please wait for an answer by the Vet. Please do NOT breed with this dog at all, not even one litter. Most of the pups will also suffer, though heriditary is not the only cause, can also be food and other reason. Also, get your dog checked by the Vet, the earlier he can start a supplement or give advice of what to do, the better..

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