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Question
Posted by: Bkb | 2010/09/07

Health and weight issues

Hi

Have serious weight issues, previously lost 27kg on weigh-less and gym. Gave it up when my dad died and gained 10kg back in a year. Made a conscious decision to get my body back but it seems to no avail. Have been following the weigh-less diet for a month and been gyming for 2 months. In the past month I have gained 1,6kg despite all the efforts. Not sure why it is not working for me anymore! I have been on Azor for many years as I suffer from panic attacks so I can''t see this as being a problem as I was on it when I lost my initial 27kg. The gym have done tests and I am also retaining water despite drinking nearly 2 litres of it per day! I don''t know where to go from here and am ready to just throw in the towel and give up. I am a 39 year old female and my weight has now ballooned to 82,6kg, I am 1,69m tall and if I calculate my BMI, I am in the obese range. Getting extremely tired of this constant battle and not being able to fit into my clothes! Please advise what I must do to sort this out!
Thanks

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageDietDoc

Dear Bkb
Your present BMI = 28,9, which is not yet in the obese range (i.e. above 30), and to get back into the normal range (18-25) you would need to weigh 68 kg (BMI = 24). This means you would need to lose 14,6 kg. It does become more difficult to lose weight when one has previously lost a great deal (your loss of 27 kg with Weigh-Less and gym is wonderful) because the body's metabolism tends to slow down to accommodate for the lower energy intake. It may be a good idea to have your dr test your hormone levels (thyroid, insulin and female hormones) to see if you have developed a hormone imbalance or insulin resistance (IR). It is essential for anyone with IR to consult a clinical dietitian, because the correct diet is one of the most important factors in treatment. Visit the Association for Dietetics in SA Website at: www.adsa.org.za and click on "Find a Dietitian" to find a dietitian in your area. The dietitian will take your IR, medications and other conditions such as overweight, into account when working out a diet for you, which will be based on low-fat foods with a low glycaemic index (GI). Click on 'Diet' and 'Weight loss' and 'The Glycaemic Index' and read the articles on the GI. Also click on ‘Food as Medicine' on the Diet Site and then on ‘Type 2 diabetes’. Please keep up your regular exercise for at least 30 min per day to help you improve your insulin and glucose levels. I don't know what exercises you are doing in the gym, but concentrate on doing aerobic exercises (running, jogging, skipping, cycling, swimming), rather than working with weights. Just be careful of not overdoing your liquid intake as this can wash important electrolytes such as sodium, potassium, magnesium and even calcium out of your body and cause so-called 'electrolyte imbalances', which may manifest as water retention. Adults require 2,5 litres of liquid a day (this includes coffee, tea, water, milk, and any other liquid you may ingest).
Hang in there
DietDoc
Best regards
DietDoc

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: DietDoc | 2010/09/08

Dear Bkb
Your present BMI = 28,9, which is not yet in the obese range (i.e. above 30), and to get back into the normal range (18-25) you would need to weigh 68 kg (BMI = 24). This means you would need to lose 14,6 kg. It does become more difficult to lose weight when one has previously lost a great deal (your loss of 27 kg with Weigh-Less and gym is wonderful) because the body's metabolism tends to slow down to accommodate for the lower energy intake. It may be a good idea to have your dr test your hormone levels (thyroid, insulin and female hormones) to see if you have developed a hormone imbalance or insulin resistance (IR). It is essential for anyone with IR to consult a clinical dietitian, because the correct diet is one of the most important factors in treatment. Visit the Association for Dietetics in SA Website at: www.adsa.org.za and click on "Find a Dietitian" to find a dietitian in your area. The dietitian will take your IR, medications and other conditions such as overweight, into account when working out a diet for you, which will be based on low-fat foods with a low glycaemic index (GI). Click on 'Diet' and 'Weight loss' and 'The Glycaemic Index' and read the articles on the GI. Also click on ‘Food as Medicine' on the Diet Site and then on ‘Type 2 diabetes’. Please keep up your regular exercise for at least 30 min per day to help you improve your insulin and glucose levels. I don't know what exercises you are doing in the gym, but concentrate on doing aerobic exercises (running, jogging, skipping, cycling, swimming), rather than working with weights. Just be careful of not overdoing your liquid intake as this can wash important electrolytes such as sodium, potassium, magnesium and even calcium out of your body and cause so-called 'electrolyte imbalances', which may manifest as water retention. Adults require 2,5 litres of liquid a day (this includes coffee, tea, water, milk, and any other liquid you may ingest).
Hang in there
DietDoc
Best regards
DietDoc

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