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Question
Posted by: Annie | 2010/09/07

Glucose tolerance test

I am struggeling with episodes of low blood glucose. My sister is a diabetic type 1 and both my grandmothers had diabetes type 2. I do have a blood glucose meter and my sugar goes as low as 3,0 mmol/l while I have eaten 2 hours prior to the low bloodglucose. I had a glucose tolerance test done as well as a fasting insuline level. My fasting insuline level as normal 5,7 uIU/ml. My fasting bloodglucose was 5,2 mmol/L. After one hour it was 5,2 mmol/L and after two houers it was 5,1 mmol/l. I would like to know what this means. Why is the glucose curve a flat line and why doesn''t it make a curve. Why then does my blood glucose sometimes go low. Mostly it goes down when I go for a brisk walk, I haven''t tested it yet after jogging. I do get symptoms of low blood sugar even when my sugar is only 4,3 mmol/l ( heart palpitations, sweating, feeling like fainting and sugary foods help to make me feel beter) I also feel very tired after my sugar had been low and it is back to normal.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageDietDoc

Dear Annie
If you suffer from what is called reactive hypoglycaemia, then the sudden drop in blood glucose and increase in insulin levels usually only occurs quite a long time after eating. In such cases the GTT needs to be done over a period of up to 4 or more hours (not fun, but it may be necessary to pinpoint exactly when your insulin peaks and your glucose crashes. For your own sake, Please consult a registered dietitian, because the correct diet is one of the most important factors in the treatment of hypoglycaemia. Visit the Association for Dietetics in SA Website at: www.adsa.org.za and click on "Find a Dietitian" to find a dietitian in your area. The dietitian will take your hypoglycaemia and exercise into account when working out a diet for you, which will be based on low-fat foods with a low glycaemic index (GI). Click on 'Diet' and 'Weight loss' and 'The Glycaemic Index' and read the articles on the GI. Also click on ‘Food as Medicine' on the Diet Site and then on ‘Type 2 diabetes’. Although it is excellent that you do exercise, the dietitian will have to advise if you need to have a high-GI food before exercise and possibly also afterwards to boost your blood glucose levels to help control the symptoms while still allowing your to exercise.
Best regards
DietDoc

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: DietDoc | 2010/09/08

Dear Annie
If you suffer from what is called reactive hypoglycaemia, then the sudden drop in blood glucose and increase in insulin levels usually only occurs quite a long time after eating. In such cases the GTT needs to be done over a period of up to 4 or more hours (not fun, but it may be necessary to pinpoint exactly when your insulin peaks and your glucose crashes. For your own sake, Please consult a registered dietitian, because the correct diet is one of the most important factors in the treatment of hypoglycaemia. Visit the Association for Dietetics in SA Website at: www.adsa.org.za and click on "Find a Dietitian" to find a dietitian in your area. The dietitian will take your hypoglycaemia and exercise into account when working out a diet for you, which will be based on low-fat foods with a low glycaemic index (GI). Click on 'Diet' and 'Weight loss' and 'The Glycaemic Index' and read the articles on the GI. Also click on ‘Food as Medicine' on the Diet Site and then on ‘Type 2 diabetes’. Although it is excellent that you do exercise, the dietitian will have to advise if you need to have a high-GI food before exercise and possibly also afterwards to boost your blood glucose levels to help control the symptoms while still allowing your to exercise.
Best regards
DietDoc

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