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Question
Posted by: Anne-Marie | 2010/08/03

Genetiese afwykings

Profesor Simpson

My Ma is nou 73 en was ''n weeskind. Ons het nie haar Ma goed geken nie, maar kon met iemand -|- ak maak wat haar geken het. Sy was ''n verbitterde ou vrou wat mense gedreig het om dood te maak en almal in die wê reld wou haar glo leed aan doen. My Ma is nou op dieselfde punt wat sy vir almal kwaad word en almal wantrou, sy het nou die dag ook die plaaswerker gedreig. Ons is 7 kinders en baie vredevol. glad nie ''n familie wat bakleierig is nie, kuier lekker wanneer ons bymekaar is in vrede. Sy het nou al met elke ene ''n stryery opgetel oor die simpelste goed, nou is dit so erg dat sy ons kinders almal afskryf.
Ons vermoed dat daar iewers iets groot fout is en dat dit dalk van haar ma oorerflik was. Sy sit op ''n klein dorpie iewers in Namibië  so ons kan haar glad nie by ''n sigiater kry nie. Kan so iets oorerflik wees en is daar hulp?want ons kinders is verstom wat nou besig is om te gebeur. Nie dat sy sonder ons kan klaarkom nie. Ons doen nog altyd alles vir haar, sy kan nie eers self geld trek of geld op haar selfoon sit nie.

U hulp sal baie waardeer word

Dankie

Anne-Marie

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I'm not entirely clear about this story. Has your mom within recent years become paranoid and unpleasant towards others ( when it is likely to be related to senility / Alzheimers or similar perhaps vascular dementia ) or has she ALWAYS been like this, from an early age, in which case it'd be more like chronic paranoia. It sounds like the former ?
And if I understand, her own mother behaved in this way from around this age, again the probability of a dementia seems high. Some causes can be inherited, though as they are common, they can occur in mother and child by chance, too. Similarly, whe you say she can't handle fairly simple things like dealing with her money or cellphone, it also sounds like a form of dementia.
One can't make a proper diagnosis without a fairly detailed in-person assesment, and one can't choose a suitable treatment without a sound and reliable diagnosis.
Is it at all possible to think of a way i which she could be persuaded and taken to see a psychiatrist in the nearest city ? If there is a really good GP at hand, he may well be able to assess her and make a reasonable diagnosis, and to provide some care.
In some forms of Alzheimer's, some expensive drugs may in some cases DELAY the worsening of the condition, but nothing beyond that. And where the condition is already fairly well established ( and that's what this sounds like ) they're not an option.
One then often has to fall back on close personal care with the family and perhaps a dedicated caregiver who need not be a trained nurse, and some medications may reduce the suspiciousness and irritability, and the confusion. SOme of the meds that do this best, though, may be associated with a slightly increased risk of heart attacks or strokes, but old age already has a substantial risk of that, anyway, and though heir use may shorten life somewhat, the possible benefits in terms of increasing the person's dignity and comfort, and that of those who love them, may outweigh that degree of risk

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: Anne-Marie | 2010/08/03

Dankie vir die terugvoering. Nee, sy was haar lewe lank ''n opgewekte liefde volle ma wat ons kinders baie gebalanseerd groot gemaak het. Sy was altyd ''n bietjie agterdogtig, vertrou nie sommer maklik iemand nie. Dit is maar die laaste jaar of wat, wat sy rê rig drasties verander het.
Inteendeel sy het met haar eie ma stry gekry oor sy so mislik en onredelik was, maar nee sy was rê rig altyd sag van geaardheid gewees.
Die tegnologie het sy ook nooit onder die knie gekry nie, want dit was nooi nodig nie, so dit is nie dat sy dit vergeet het nie daar was net altyd iemand wat dit vir haar kon doen.
Ek weet net nie hoe ons haar gaan oortuig om by ''n dokter uit te kom nie, want sy glo die fout lê  by ons, daar is niks fout met haar nie.
Sy bly op hierdie stadium saam met my oudste suster op die plaas, maar maak die lewe vir haar en die werkers so moeilik dat almal wil loop.
Sy wil nou met niemand van ons praat nie, en wil nou alleen in Hentiesbaai gaan bly.

Dankie vir die hulp, hier op die platteland is ons hande redelik afgekap.

Anne-Marie

Reply to Anne-Marie
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/08/03

I'm not entirely clear about this story. Has your mom within recent years become paranoid and unpleasant towards others ( when it is likely to be related to senility / Alzheimers or similar perhaps vascular dementia ) or has she ALWAYS been like this, from an early age, in which case it'd be more like chronic paranoia. It sounds like the former ?
And if I understand, her own mother behaved in this way from around this age, again the probability of a dementia seems high. Some causes can be inherited, though as they are common, they can occur in mother and child by chance, too. Similarly, whe you say she can't handle fairly simple things like dealing with her money or cellphone, it also sounds like a form of dementia.
One can't make a proper diagnosis without a fairly detailed in-person assesment, and one can't choose a suitable treatment without a sound and reliable diagnosis.
Is it at all possible to think of a way i which she could be persuaded and taken to see a psychiatrist in the nearest city ? If there is a really good GP at hand, he may well be able to assess her and make a reasonable diagnosis, and to provide some care.
In some forms of Alzheimer's, some expensive drugs may in some cases DELAY the worsening of the condition, but nothing beyond that. And where the condition is already fairly well established ( and that's what this sounds like ) they're not an option.
One then often has to fall back on close personal care with the family and perhaps a dedicated caregiver who need not be a trained nurse, and some medications may reduce the suspiciousness and irritability, and the confusion. SOme of the meds that do this best, though, may be associated with a slightly increased risk of heart attacks or strokes, but old age already has a substantial risk of that, anyway, and though heir use may shorten life somewhat, the possible benefits in terms of increasing the person's dignity and comfort, and that of those who love them, may outweigh that degree of risk

Reply to cybershrink

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