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Question
Posted by: Nic | 2012/02/20

Female cat spraying

Please help me! My 10 year old, spayed, female cat has been spraying on my kitchen counter for the past 10 months, and regardless of the different sprays and tricks I''ve tried, nothing seems to help. She goes outside for all her other ablutions, but sprays all over my utensils, food, and worst of all, all my babies things. I keep everything I can in airtight containers, but am disinfecting my kitchen counters / utensils every second day! My little girl is 2 now, and we''d like to have another baby this year, but my cat spraying is causing me so much stress, I can''t even imagine bringing a new baby into the mix!

Our vet has ruled out a UTI. We''ve tried calming meds etc..., and nothing helps. Please can someone give me some solid advice ~ it''s become such a big problem that we''re considering having her put down :(

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Hi Nic

Sorry to here of your problems. I suspects that the problem is behavioral associated and this could be problematic in treating as you need to identify what the initiating causes. Possible
solutions may include one or all of the following:
1) Ensure that the cat has easy access to litter trays and that the sand/crystals are changed on a regular basis.
2) Some owners place food and water bowls next to where the cat urinates as cats generally don't like urinating next to their food/water source.
3) Try and restrict the cat to certain areas of the house so that it does not have access to your little girls room e.t.c.
4) Use detergents that do not contain ammonia.
5) Please ensure that there no other cats have access to the property as this may induce a territorial response - install a cat flap that will only allow your cat access to the house.
6) If the behaviour is stress associated then try and spend more time interacting with your cat.
7) Try using certain pheromone products such as Feliway e.t.c.
8) Ask your vet about the use of progestins as a behavioral modifier. It must be noted that these products can be contraindicated so veterinary advice is paramount prior to use.
9) Please try and eliminate negative human behavioral responses/actions as this may make the problem a lot worse.
10) Contact a qualified animal behaviorist for advice.


I hope this helps.


Kind regards


Angus Campbell

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: CyberVet | 2012/02/24

Hi Nic

Sorry to here of your problems. I suspects that the problem is behavioral associated and this could be problematic in treating as you need to identify what the initiating causes. Possible
solutions may include one or all of the following:
1) Ensure that the cat has easy access to litter trays and that the sand/crystals are changed on a regular basis.
2) Some owners place food and water bowls next to where the cat urinates as cats generally don't like urinating next to their food/water source.
3) Try and restrict the cat to certain areas of the house so that it does not have access to your little girls room e.t.c.
4) Use detergents that do not contain ammonia.
5) Please ensure that there no other cats have access to the property as this may induce a territorial response - install a cat flap that will only allow your cat access to the house.
6) If the behaviour is stress associated then try and spend more time interacting with your cat.
7) Try using certain pheromone products such as Feliway e.t.c.
8) Ask your vet about the use of progestins as a behavioral modifier. It must be noted that these products can be contraindicated so veterinary advice is paramount prior to use.
9) Please try and eliminate negative human behavioral responses/actions as this may make the problem a lot worse.
10) Contact a qualified animal behaviorist for advice.


I hope this helps.


Kind regards


Angus Campbell

Reply to CyberVet

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