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Question
Posted by: Marius | 2012-01-19

Failed important blood test - why?

I recently travelled to an Asian country and took Noxidem Zolpidem tartrate 10mg together with Lethyl 30mg to help me to sleep in order to shake off the jet lag asap. I thought it would assist to get me quickly into a new sleeping pattern as I had to work from day of arrival. However the government required medical checkup picked up heroin. I have never taken any form of drugs other than prescriptive medication. Question 1: Is heroin a ingredient in either of these medications? Question 2: How long will it take to clear from my blood as I am due for a follow up blood test in a week?
PS. I also had two Adco-dols the night before the test. The other two medications I had two or three days prior to the test. (Obviously I wasn''t thinking.)

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Our expert says:
Expert ImagePharmacist

Hi Marius

In your case the false positive was most probably a result of CODEINE in the Adco-Dol Tablets (it contains 10mg codeine) and will trigger drug tests for OPIATES. (Non of the medicines you've taken contains heroin!)

Furthermore I'd advice against taking any of these meds in next 7 days - If you do this, your test should be clean.

"Opiates: (OPI) Opiates are any of the addictive narcotic drugs derived from the resin of the poppy plant. Opiates are analgesics (pain reducers) which work by depressing the central nervous system. They can also depress the respiratory system. Doctors often prescribe them for severe or chronic pain. Opiates are very addictive, both physically and psychologically. Use for only a short time normally results in addiction. Some commonly used opiates are: Codeine, Darvon, Heroin, Methadone, Morphine, Opium, Percodan, Talwin, Dilaudid and Demerol. Opiates are commonly referred to as "downers". Opiates can appear in many forms: white powder or crystals; small white, yellow or orange pills; large colorful capsules; clear liquid and dark brown, sticky bars or balls. Heroin accounts for the majority of the illicit opiate abuse. Some physical indications of opiate use include: extreme loss of appetite and weight, needle tracks or punctures, black and blue marks from "skin popping", scars along veins, cramps, nausea, vomiting, excessive scratching and complaint of itching, excessive sweating, constipation, raw, red nostrils from snorting, runny nose, pin-point pupils and watery eyes, reduced vision, drowsiness, euphoria, trance-like states, excessive thirst, tremors, twitching, unkempt appearance, strong body odor, irritability, chills; slight hallucinations and lethargy. Opiates reduce attention span, sensory and motor abilities, produce irrational behavior, depression, paranoia, and other psychological abnormalities. "

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: Marius | 2012-02-02

I did much research - since I was at the point of being deported and came to the same conclusion. Codeine=drug test failure. Thank you. Mercifully they accepted my story and allowed a second test one week later which I passed. Others have be tossed out of the country after the first test.

Reply to Marius
Posted by: pharmacist | 2012-01-20

Hi Marius

In your case the false positive was most probably a result of CODEINE in the Adco-Dol Tablets (it contains 10mg codeine) and will trigger drug tests for OPIATES. (Non of the medicines you've taken contains heroin!)

Furthermore I'd advice against taking any of these meds in next 7 days - If you do this, your test should be clean.

"Opiates: (OPI) Opiates are any of the addictive narcotic drugs derived from the resin of the poppy plant. Opiates are analgesics (pain reducers) which work by depressing the central nervous system. They can also depress the respiratory system. Doctors often prescribe them for severe or chronic pain. Opiates are very addictive, both physically and psychologically. Use for only a short time normally results in addiction. Some commonly used opiates are: Codeine, Darvon, Heroin, Methadone, Morphine, Opium, Percodan, Talwin, Dilaudid and Demerol. Opiates are commonly referred to as "downers". Opiates can appear in many forms: white powder or crystals; small white, yellow or orange pills; large colorful capsules; clear liquid and dark brown, sticky bars or balls. Heroin accounts for the majority of the illicit opiate abuse. Some physical indications of opiate use include: extreme loss of appetite and weight, needle tracks or punctures, black and blue marks from "skin popping", scars along veins, cramps, nausea, vomiting, excessive scratching and complaint of itching, excessive sweating, constipation, raw, red nostrils from snorting, runny nose, pin-point pupils and watery eyes, reduced vision, drowsiness, euphoria, trance-like states, excessive thirst, tremors, twitching, unkempt appearance, strong body odor, irritability, chills; slight hallucinations and lethargy. Opiates reduce attention span, sensory and motor abilities, produce irrational behavior, depression, paranoia, and other psychological abnormalities. "

Reply to pharmacist

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