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Question
Posted by: lee | 2010-09-01

exercise??

i started gym last week in a bid to lose weight and each day i push myself very hard at the gym. i was told that exercise only accounts for 10% of weighloss and the other 90% is what you eat and now im demotivated to push myself at the gym. i thought to myself if exercise accounts for 10% then why should i bother? i can concentrate on the 90% and lose weight, is this true? should i quit gym? what is your personal and your professional opinion? thank you in advance.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFitnessDoc

Hi Lee

Don't be demotivated - I'd say that balance is not quite as extreme as that. It is true that EARLY ON, diet makes more of an impact than exercise. That is, the quickest way to lose weight is to cut down on energy in.

But there is now a lot of research that shows that people who just diet, and don't exercise, have a much lower chance of keeping that weight off in the longer term. I seem to recall a study that showed that 8 out of 10 people who dieted regained the weight (plus interest) within a year of starting, whereas 60% of exercisers kept it off.

So there is a benefit that people often don't think about.

And then added to this, if you exercise and diet, then you add the benefits exponentially. That is, it's about energy balance, and so if you are eating sensibly, and exercising, then you're taking in less and burning more, which means that balance is shifted far more than doing one only. So I honestly think exercise is crucial.

You just need to understand that they work together, and at different times, for different reasons. I would say exercise with the goal of getting fit and healthy, and allow weight to take care of itself!

Good luck

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3
Our users say:
Posted by: fitnessdoc | 2010-09-06

Hi Lee

Don't be demotivated - I'd say that balance is not quite as extreme as that. It is true that EARLY ON, diet makes more of an impact than exercise. That is, the quickest way to lose weight is to cut down on energy in.

But there is now a lot of research that shows that people who just diet, and don't exercise, have a much lower chance of keeping that weight off in the longer term. I seem to recall a study that showed that 8 out of 10 people who dieted regained the weight (plus interest) within a year of starting, whereas 60% of exercisers kept it off.

So there is a benefit that people often don't think about.

And then added to this, if you exercise and diet, then you add the benefits exponentially. That is, it's about energy balance, and so if you are eating sensibly, and exercising, then you're taking in less and burning more, which means that balance is shifted far more than doing one only. So I honestly think exercise is crucial.

You just need to understand that they work together, and at different times, for different reasons. I would say exercise with the goal of getting fit and healthy, and allow weight to take care of itself!

Good luck

Reply to fitnessdoc
Posted by: Zama | 2010-09-03

Yo get a nice toned body from exercising NOT dieting. Anon is right, you feel like you are on top of the worl after a session in gym

Reply to Zama
Posted by: Anon | 2010-09-02

I personally think that just the good feeling you get from exercising is enough to keep going. Don''t gym to lose weight, do it to be active and healthy. It might only count for 10% for weight loss, but it counts a hell of a lot more for overall health (mentally and fisically).

Reply to Anon

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