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Question
Posted by: ASM | 2010-06-22

Epileptic or " Fits" 

Hi guys please help me out, on Sunday my dog had an attack, something like the epileptic “ fits”  for few second after that it was ok, immediately I took him to the vet and she didn’ t do much she only checked his temperature which was normal and the heart bit was also normal. The vet only give him an injection to relax his muscles. My dog is a mix breed of GSD x Pekinese he is 5 and half years. Yesterday I took him for to SPCA there they checked and says the micro scope shows his white cell are higher, and they give him an injection and Baytril 50mg to take every morning. They said if he had another attack they will draw blood from him and go and test for lungs, kidneys and heart.

Is this good enough, I’ m so worried, I love my baby so much on Sunday I thought I was losing him, the whole day he was ok it just happened. Has anyone encounter this problem before?? I’ m at work today and I can’ t even concentrate, I keep calling home to check if he is ok.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Hi ASM Firstly are you sure the dog is fitting There are usually 4 clear phases in a fitting animal : Phase 1 - the prodromal phase : abnormal behaviour. Can last for several hours. Phase 2 - the aura - a very short-lasting period of unusual behaviour just before the seizures Phase 3 - the ictus or fit - uncontrollable limb movements, often the head is extended backwards, there is increased salivation, chomping of the jaws and vocalisation. Often animals lose control of their bowels and of their urinary bladder during this phase. It usually only last 2-3 minutes, but the fits can recur very rapidly inducing a state of continuous fitting (status epilepticus) Phase 4 - the postictus - animals are dazed, disorientated, stagger about and show altered behaviour such as an inability to recognize familiar people during the 2-3 hours following a fit. There are many causes to fitting. Generally they can be classifies as follows: Inside the Skull a) structural lesion - e.g. encephalitis, traumatic injury, space occupying lesion b) non-structural lesion i.e idiopathic epilepsy Outside the skull a) liver failure - high blood amonium b) End stage kidney failure c) Poisoning - various toxins d) hypoglycaemia - low blood sugar levels Certain breeds that maybe genetically predisposed to idiopathic epilepsy includes German Shepard Dogs. Complications can arise especially if the fitting is prolonged(status epilepticus) as this can result in permanent brain damage with associated changes in behaviour. Prolonged status epilepticus can be fatal. Diagnosis is confirmed based on a proper clinical examination, Lab diagnostics and imaging techniques. The latter is very expensive. Generally we treat if we get more than 1 epileptic fits in a period of 3 mths. The drug that is commonly used is Phenobarb with diazipam being used to control status epilepticus. If you are unhappy then I think that you need to seek a second opinion. I hope this information is of use. The medication that you are on is an antibiotic. I would advise that you revisit the vet and ask for further testing or to prescribe the medication as indicated and see what happens

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Chill | 2010-06-24

Well no - Baytril is an antibiotic. But that is the way to go at first - no point assuming epilepsy and treating for that until you are sure that the problem wasn''t caused by something else.
It sounds to me that you''re doing the right things - just give things a chance to settle, I''m sure he''ll be ok.

Reply to Chill
Posted by: ASM | 2010-06-24

thank you once again dear 
ooh also the table that the Vet gave him Baytril 50mg, are they good for his condition for instance if he really have “  Seizures or fits”  i was told by SPCA Vet to gave them to him for period of 5 days.

Reply to ASM
Posted by: Chill | 2010-06-23

I seriously doubt it''s the change in diet that caused this, when I said maybe he ate something that disagreed with him, I meant more along the lines of something harmful like a toxic plant, or something he found in the garden.

Eukanuba is definitely far superior to Alpo in terms of quality - the big thing about ordinary ''supermarket'' dogfoods is that they do a lot of experimenting in terms of making it tasty so dogs like it - it seems to have worked in your dog''s case. If you can afford the Eukanuba, or one of the other premium dogfood brands, it is healthier for them, but of course if you can''t, the Alpo will be fine too. The best way to tell is to watch the dog''s condition - if he is lively and playful and healthy looking, then he''s doing ok!

Reply to Chill
Posted by: ASM | 2010-06-23

thank you very much for all your response. the reason I took him to the SPCA was because of finance. I thought they will be cheaper, but like you said i will wait and see what happens.

I know the mix breed of GSD x Pekinese is unusual, but hey my dog is a very handsome and obedient dog, very spoil I will say and kind of picky. It is also a well trained dog, doesn’ t like to stay outside it loves being indoor most of the time. Now in winter it is even worse. You will fall in love with it the minutes you see it. That is why I cannot imagine my life without it. He’ s wonderful!

The other thing I used to give him Eukanuba and recently I stop, and started given him Alpo, do you think this might be the course of all this, he loves them so much he didn’ t like the Eukanuba he will go for 2 days without eating them, but this one he eat them everyday

Reply to ASM
Posted by: Chill | 2010-06-22

I don''t think you should be panicking quite so much (although I know that''s easy to say!). You have done the right things, so far, and I think you should wait and see what happens - chances are he''ll be fine.

One thing, though: I always believe it''s best to let an animal be treated by one vet at a time, unless you are unhappy for some reason, in which case by all means switch vets. Sometimes tracking down the cause of a thing like this takes a bit of work, and you don''t want to have to go through everything twice (nor do you want bits skipped out!).

If the dog has indeed got epilepsy, then it''s not the end of the world - many dogs have it, and it can usually be very well controlled with drugs, once you have established the right dosage. Fits needn''t necessarily be epileptic - maybe the dog ate something that caused a reaction, for example.

In passing - GSD/pekinese sounds like a very interesting mix!

Reply to Chill
Posted by: ASM | 2010-06-22

this is what happened I’ m not sure how to explain it. My dog was ok the whole morning suddenly in the late afternoon around 18h00, he started running around the house as if he was nervous. He became weak couldn''t move properly, he started running around he went outside I followed him carry him to the house then he fall to the ground, throw his heads back, open their mouths the was a foam/drool. his legs were shaking he was losing consciousness, after few minute he was ok. It looked like someone having a fits? The pills that they give him are they ok? Please help how expensive it is to draw blood and take to the lab? at the SPCA and at the vet

Reply to ASM
Posted by: CyberVet | 2010-06-22

Hi ASM Firstly are you sure the dog is fitting There are usually 4 clear phases in a fitting animal : Phase 1 - the prodromal phase : abnormal behaviour. Can last for several hours. Phase 2 - the aura - a very short-lasting period of unusual behaviour just before the seizures Phase 3 - the ictus or fit - uncontrollable limb movements, often the head is extended backwards, there is increased salivation, chomping of the jaws and vocalisation. Often animals lose control of their bowels and of their urinary bladder during this phase. It usually only last 2-3 minutes, but the fits can recur very rapidly inducing a state of continuous fitting (status epilepticus) Phase 4 - the postictus - animals are dazed, disorientated, stagger about and show altered behaviour such as an inability to recognize familiar people during the 2-3 hours following a fit. There are many causes to fitting. Generally they can be classifies as follows: Inside the Skull a) structural lesion - e.g. encephalitis, traumatic injury, space occupying lesion b) non-structural lesion i.e idiopathic epilepsy Outside the skull a) liver failure - high blood amonium b) End stage kidney failure c) Poisoning - various toxins d) hypoglycaemia - low blood sugar levels Certain breeds that maybe genetically predisposed to idiopathic epilepsy includes German Shepard Dogs. Complications can arise especially if the fitting is prolonged(status epilepticus) as this can result in permanent brain damage with associated changes in behaviour. Prolonged status epilepticus can be fatal. Diagnosis is confirmed based on a proper clinical examination, Lab diagnostics and imaging techniques. The latter is very expensive. Generally we treat if we get more than 1 epileptic fits in a period of 3 mths. The drug that is commonly used is Phenobarb with diazipam being used to control status epilepticus. If you are unhappy then I think that you need to seek a second opinion. I hope this information is of use. The medication that you are on is an antibiotic. I would advise that you revisit the vet and ask for further testing or to prescribe the medication as indicated and see what happens

Reply to CyberVet

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