Posted by: Topaz20 | 2009-02-23

Ectopic pregnancy and PCOS

I had an ectopic pregnancy in 2005 and my right tube was removed. Six weeks after the laparoscopy and D& C, I fell pregnant and gave birth to a little boy. It’ s now been 3 years and I would like to have another child. I left the pill in May last year and had regular cycles from June to November. I did not get a period for the last 3 months.

I have gone back to my gynae (Dr Kruger) and she has requested the relevant blood tests as I have PCOS. A sonar was done and the doc did note a large follicle. Based on the blood test, a plan of action would be agreed upon. There was mention of a new product called Inofolic that could help with the Insulin resistance. I previously used Glucophage and one course of Fertomid. I would like to know what are the odds of me falling pregnant with my history? What are the chances of me having another ectopic pregnancy and can fertomid cause an ectopic?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFertility expert

Dear Topaz20

The first instance the likelihood of a second ectopic is certainly increased by approximately 40%. Further more the chance of conception due to one tube being absent is reduced to every alternate ovulation and enhance the overall fertility prospects will be halved. In addition the added problem of ovulatory dysfunction due to the PCOS will further make conception difficult. Therefore the approach to this problem requires very careful evaluation in terms of ovulation induction and it’s monitoring, which I would advise by ultrasound scanning. In addition a recent sperm analysis is required to establish the likelihood of success with either natural intercourse or intrauterine insemination. To obviate the possible problems such as ectopic pregnancy obviously failure to achieve a conception my recommendation would be to perhaps pursue the soft stimulation in-vitro fertilization route if this is at all affordable. This option will not only enhance your pregnancy prospects but may well avoid the likelihood of a repeat ectopic pregnancy as well.

Answered by: Dr M.I. Cassim

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