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Question
Posted by: Gisela | 2011-10-02

Early onset of menopause

I have recently had a lapscope which identified that I had stage 2 endemetrosis. I was told that the operation was successful and everyhting was fine. Prior to the surgery, all my blood tests were great.

Since then i have been diagnosed with early onset of menopause. Has anyone experienced this and are there any treatments available?

Thanks

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFertility expert

Dear Gisela

It is not unusual for some patients to undergo abrupt or fairly rapid ovarian failure. It is important to distinguish between premature ovarian failure and premature menopause. In the case of the premature menopause the implication is that the ovaries have no eggs left and therefore fertility is highly unlikely. In the case of premature ovarian failure the problem may be a transient one and there maybe phases in which conception and treatment is possible. The main problem with premature ovarian failure is a receptor problem rather than an egg depletion problem. I would recommend that you seek advice from your fertility specialist as to what type of ovarian failure you are dealing with so as to plan your future accordingly.

Answered by: Dr M.I. Cassim

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Our users say:
Posted by: Fertility expert | 2011-10-11

Dear Gisela

It is not unusual for some patients to undergo abrupt or fairly rapid ovarian failure. It is important to distinguish between premature ovarian failure and premature menopause. In the case of the premature menopause the implication is that the ovaries have no eggs left and therefore fertility is highly unlikely. In the case of premature ovarian failure the problem may be a transient one and there maybe phases in which conception and treatment is possible. The main problem with premature ovarian failure is a receptor problem rather than an egg depletion problem. I would recommend that you seek advice from your fertility specialist as to what type of ovarian failure you are dealing with so as to plan your future accordingly.

Answered by: Dr M.I. Cassim

Reply to Fertility expert
Posted by: Rejeane | 2011-10-02

Hello Gisela

I had the same problem 3 years ago. Prior to the op, I had regular 26/28 day cycles. But after the op, my cycles stayed away for almost 6-7 months, by which time I was also diagnosed as premature menopause. I was only 33 yrs at the time, and so dearly wanted child- the main reason why I opted for the surgery- the endo was discovered after I failed to conceive after trying for 4 yrs.

In my case, it was alleged that it was a medication (Zoladex inj) which was given 1 month before the surgery that caused the " menopause" .
I am happy to report that my cycle returned about a year ago, after seeing an alternative practitioner. I am not yet pregnant though, but my FSH was still slightly high at 12, which means that
I am not menopausal, but producing poor quality eggs.

I hope that yours will be temporary too. Kindly check with your doc if it could be medication related too.

Best of luck and please get a second opinion.


Reply to Rejeane

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