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Question
Posted by: Garfield | 2010/09/20

Drawing pictures?

Hi CS

I hope you are well &  happy &  enjoying the spring time!

I just wanted to ''pic your brain'' on something ... a friend of mine has had 2 sessions with a CBT Psychologist. The Psychologist is very newly qualified. From the start, he was open with her &  said he wanted help with his jealousy &  temper issues.

Apparently the first session went fine &  he said he felt like he could communicate honestly with her. But during the second session, all she asked him to do was some really simple, obvious questionnaires about moods &  then to draw pictures ... for the whole hour ... a house, a person &  a family. She would ask him questions about each drawing, such as ''who is the person you have drawn, what is their name, what are they thinking ...''

He left the session feeling silly, embarrassed &  ripped off.

Now, I am not a psychologist, but I thought pictures were used for children or adults that have difficulty expressing themselves ... &  he said he didnt!? Am I missing anything here that you can perhaps shed some light on?!

Many Thanks!

Garfield

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Enjoying the spring, but not the pollen.
The questionnaires and picture-drawing are not at all a part of CBT, but some psychologists like to use them as a method of assessing an individual's problems. I agree that it seems inappropriate and unhelpful in a patient fully able to communicate. Some psychologist's feel though that such methods, sometimes called "projective tests" reveal aspects of a person indirectly, that they may not be aware of consciously or may not communicate in other manners.
He should discuss with her his sense of disappointment and his eagerness to get on with CBT as such.
Maybe if she starts with the drawings again, he should try doing a drawing of himself lying on a couch, and her sittin beside him, and explain that the guy on the couch is wondering why they don't actually get on with the therapy !

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/09/21

Enjoying the spring, but not the pollen.
The questionnaires and picture-drawing are not at all a part of CBT, but some psychologists like to use them as a method of assessing an individual's problems. I agree that it seems inappropriate and unhelpful in a patient fully able to communicate. Some psychologist's feel though that such methods, sometimes called "projective tests" reveal aspects of a person indirectly, that they may not be aware of consciously or may not communicate in other manners.
He should discuss with her his sense of disappointment and his eagerness to get on with CBT as such.
Maybe if she starts with the drawings again, he should try doing a drawing of himself lying on a couch, and her sittin beside him, and explain that the guy on the couch is wondering why they don't actually get on with the therapy !

Reply to cybershrink
Posted by: K | 2010/09/20

If he expresses himself so easily, why doesn''t he just ask her what it is all about and point out that he feels embarrassed?

Reply to K

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