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Question
Posted by: ADDult | 2010/03/11

Dopamine Down regulation

I have an interesting question. Let’ s just assume my dopamine levels are ok and I take Ritalin, will my brain down regulated dopamine to keep it in balance or will it cause a dopamine overload. I guess what I am trying to ask is that if I am not ADD anymore will that cause a problem. Why does an increase in dopamine cause more adrenalin to flow and can you take Prozac with Ritalin? Why does Ritalin force a person to suffer with anxiety? Is this the adrenalin rush?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Remember that though there are some quite elegant theoretical models to explain why drug A seems to be useful on condition B ; and the story for any particular drug focusses on the primary chemical action for which that drug is known, the reality is always much more complex than that.
Each drug may have one predominant or obvious chemical effect, but rarely does nothing but that - and may also affect other chemicals less obviously, or indirectly. And then, increasing or decreasing the available levels of one chemical in itself usually affects the levels of other chemicals, as they interact. One's brain tries to keep balance, and to prevent an excess of any chemical, perhaps more effectively than it acts to prevent a lack of suh chemicals.
And though people with deep knowledge of the brain chemistry beyond that which I can muster, can theorize about what COULD or even SHOULD happen, most existing research looks at specif drugs, in particular situations, and particular chemicals, for many reasons - lack of funding and practicality of trying to measure and study too many different issues in any one study, being notable.
People wanting to market Prozac, will sponsor research to show that Prozac is effective and safe, and those planning to market Ritalin will want to establish efficacy and safety for their product. All the potential interactions are of no benefit or interest to them, and study of such interactions doesn't get funded much, unless by chance a dramaically useful or harmful interaction turns up by accident and compels them to do so.
Also, the drugs are introduced after much funded research, for a patiular indication or use. Occasionally, when the company's exclusive patent for that use of the drug is due to run out, they might fund further research to see if it might have another particular use, for which they can seek a further profitable exclusive patent.
The sort of sensible and interesting questions you are asking, arise usually long after the original drugs have been maketed and usually when they are available in generics, and nobody is any longer funding serious research on other aspects of their use

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/03/11

Remember that though there are some quite elegant theoretical models to explain why drug A seems to be useful on condition B ; and the story for any particular drug focusses on the primary chemical action for which that drug is known, the reality is always much more complex than that.
Each drug may have one predominant or obvious chemical effect, but rarely does nothing but that - and may also affect other chemicals less obviously, or indirectly. And then, increasing or decreasing the available levels of one chemical in itself usually affects the levels of other chemicals, as they interact. One's brain tries to keep balance, and to prevent an excess of any chemical, perhaps more effectively than it acts to prevent a lack of suh chemicals.
And though people with deep knowledge of the brain chemistry beyond that which I can muster, can theorize about what COULD or even SHOULD happen, most existing research looks at specif drugs, in particular situations, and particular chemicals, for many reasons - lack of funding and practicality of trying to measure and study too many different issues in any one study, being notable.
People wanting to market Prozac, will sponsor research to show that Prozac is effective and safe, and those planning to market Ritalin will want to establish efficacy and safety for their product. All the potential interactions are of no benefit or interest to them, and study of such interactions doesn't get funded much, unless by chance a dramaically useful or harmful interaction turns up by accident and compels them to do so.
Also, the drugs are introduced after much funded research, for a patiular indication or use. Occasionally, when the company's exclusive patent for that use of the drug is due to run out, they might fund further research to see if it might have another particular use, for which they can seek a further profitable exclusive patent.
The sort of sensible and interesting questions you are asking, arise usually long after the original drugs have been maketed and usually when they are available in generics, and nobody is any longer funding serious research on other aspects of their use

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