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Question
Posted by: Reinette | 2010/05/25

Dog stung by a bee inside his mouth

My dog was stung by a bee inside his mouth over the weekend. He immediately started to vomit, his gums were pale and he was just lying down. The Vets in CT charge a consultation fee of R700 when you need to see them over a weekend. Unfortunately I could not afford to pay them that and do are a cash only practise. I was helpless, to say the least!

I made a couple of phone calls to ask whether there is any medication/tablet that they can prescribe if this ever happens again? I do understand that you have to get your pet to a vet right away, but to prevent my boston terrier from going into shock, I want to know if there is any medication that we as owners can administrate until we can get him to a vet since they can go into shock within a few minutes. The same Veterinary practice also said to me that unfortunately there is nothing that we can do as owners and our only solution is to get him to a Vet right away. I'm sure that having an emergency cortisone or antihistamine tablet on hand might safe his life?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Hi Reinette

I understand your frustration in dealing with this matter.

Yes, you can use cortisone or anti-histamine tablets, but unfortunately they have to be absorbed, and by the time they become effective your Boston my be in anaphylactic shock and suffering from respiratory distress. In addition, this could be more of a problem as some Bostons suffer Brachycephalic Respiratory Syndrome.

Antihistamines that my be of use are:
1) Chlorpheniramine (Piriton) - Dose: 2-4mg/small to medium dog every 8-12hrs.
2)Diphenhydramine ( Benylin, Medinex, Nytol) - 1-2mg/kg every 8-12hrs.
3)Promethazine (Phenergan) - 0.2-0.4mg/kg (can give up to 1mg/kg)every 6-8 hrs.
4)Trimeprazine (Vallergan) - 0.5-2mg/kg every 12 hrs.

Please consult your local veterinary practice before administering as there are side effects such as sedation e.t.c.

The following steps are only an indication of what could be done if no vet was available, but it is risky and should be done by a qualified vet:

Step 1: Remove the stinger immediately in case your dog is allergic to the poison and goes into anaphylactic shock. Using a credit card, scrape out the part of the stinger you can see or pull the whole stinger out with tweezers, but only if you can reach it. Breaking it will allow more poison into your dog's blood stream. If you can't reach it, leave it alone unless your dog needs veterinary attention. Then let your vet get it out.

Step 2: Assess your dog's physical condition. If he or she is having problems breathing, acts weak, disoriented, or is vomiting or having diarrhea, see a veterinarian immediately. If your dog seems OK, continue to keep an eye on them for at least 24 hours.

Step 3: Clean the area of the sting with a baking soda and water paste. This will also help if the area starts to swell or gets itchy.

Step 4: Give your dog a dose of an over-the-counter antihistamine to counteract minor reactions, but only after you've gotten approval and dosage information from your veterinarian.

Step 5: Use a cold pack on the area for a few minutes several times a day to help with any lingering pain your dog may experience. The cold should also help with any low grade fever your dog may be carrying.

PLEASE NOTE: If your dog has previously had a bee sting resulting in anaphylactic shock and gets stung again, it's crucial to get him/her to a vet immediately.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: CyberVet | 2010/05/26

Hi Reinette

I understand your frustration in dealing with this matter.

Yes, you can use cortisone or anti-histamine tablets, but unfortunately they have to be absorbed, and by the time they become effective your Boston my be in anaphylactic shock and suffering from respiratory distress. In addition, this could be more of a problem as some Bostons suffer Brachycephalic Respiratory Syndrome.

Antihistamines that my be of use are:
1) Chlorpheniramine (Piriton) - Dose: 2-4mg/small to medium dog every 8-12hrs.
2)Diphenhydramine ( Benylin, Medinex, Nytol) - 1-2mg/kg every 8-12hrs.
3)Promethazine (Phenergan) - 0.2-0.4mg/kg (can give up to 1mg/kg)every 6-8 hrs.
4)Trimeprazine (Vallergan) - 0.5-2mg/kg every 12 hrs.

Please consult your local veterinary practice before administering as there are side effects such as sedation e.t.c.

The following steps are only an indication of what could be done if no vet was available, but it is risky and should be done by a qualified vet:

Step 1: Remove the stinger immediately in case your dog is allergic to the poison and goes into anaphylactic shock. Using a credit card, scrape out the part of the stinger you can see or pull the whole stinger out with tweezers, but only if you can reach it. Breaking it will allow more poison into your dog's blood stream. If you can't reach it, leave it alone unless your dog needs veterinary attention. Then let your vet get it out.

Step 2: Assess your dog's physical condition. If he or she is having problems breathing, acts weak, disoriented, or is vomiting or having diarrhea, see a veterinarian immediately. If your dog seems OK, continue to keep an eye on them for at least 24 hours.

Step 3: Clean the area of the sting with a baking soda and water paste. This will also help if the area starts to swell or gets itchy.

Step 4: Give your dog a dose of an over-the-counter antihistamine to counteract minor reactions, but only after you've gotten approval and dosage information from your veterinarian.

Step 5: Use a cold pack on the area for a few minutes several times a day to help with any lingering pain your dog may experience. The cold should also help with any low grade fever your dog may be carrying.

PLEASE NOTE: If your dog has previously had a bee sting resulting in anaphylactic shock and gets stung again, it's crucial to get him/her to a vet immediately.

Reply to CyberVet

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