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Posted by: Anonymous | 2009-10-22

desperate owner

we bought a puppy from the pet shop as we saw her there for 4 months and felt really bad for her, she' s such a lovely little thing and we have had her for 2.5 years now. the problem with her is that she gets hysterical when we leave her alone at home. i work for 3 hours 4 days a week, other than that she is with us. when i leave her she screams and barks terribly. i have a DAP diffuser, and use a collar that sprays her when she barks. i ignore her when i leave and when i come home so that she will realise that it is no " event"  when i go and nothing to get stressed about. she was ok for a while but now she wees on our beds and the mats inside from time to time, she also makes a terrible fuss when we walk her, pulling and generally barking. we are desperate to sort out this behaviour so that it is easier to manage her, as we dont feel that simply giving her away is a solution. any ideas?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Dear Anon

Only to find a person that can help you locally with behaviour.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Bee | 2009-11-05

Hi all

We have a female bulldog that is just over a year old. My husband currently works from home so he is with her most of the day.

We are moving to PE at the end of the year, to a much larger property (house and garden) and will get her a friend.

But I can' t help to wonder what she would prefer: her current smaller house with small garden but dad is home most of the day or a larger house and garden plus a friend but no dad at home any longer during the day.

We will still walk with her / them every day when we move like we do now. but will she be okay? does a friend justify not being there during the day?

Reply to Bee
Posted by: Bee | 2009-11-05

Hi all

We have a female bulldog that is just over a year old. My husband currently works from home so he is with her most of the day.

We are moving to PE at the end of the year, to a much larger property (house and garden) and will get her a friend.

But I can' t help to wonder what she would prefer: her current smaller house with small garden but dad is home most of the day or a larger house and garden plus a friend but no dad at home any longer during the day.

We will still walk with her / them every day when we move like we do now. but will she be okay? does a friend justify not being there during the day?

Reply to Bee
Posted by: Kitten | 2009-10-27

I have a daschund who displayed the exact same behavior, went through the behaviorlist / ignoring thing etc. He calmed down when we bought home another friend for him - it was quite a struggle at first to get them to get along but if I look at him now I can' t believe its the same dog. Good luck

Reply to Kitten
Posted by: Anonymous | 2009-10-26

Hi all, thanks. We have had a behavioursit, he was little help though and told us she has separation anxiety and suggested meds to calm her for a while. We are reluctanct to go with the meds as we have used them before and the effect is really only transient. As soon as we stop the meds she' s back to her normal self. We' ll just have to keep trying !

Reply to Anonymous
Posted by: Cybervet | 2009-10-26

Dear Anon

Only to find a person that can help you locally with behaviour.

Reply to Cybervet
Posted by: Chill | 2009-10-24

I think the solution to this problem is rather dependent on your circumstances. I think that what I would do in such a case is firstly, assign an area smaller than the whole house to the dog - for example, the kitchen. Then, I' d accustom the dog to remaining there under stress-free circumstances, for short periods, initially - ie, when you are at home. Obviously the dog must have everything it needs there - a bed, water, newspaper to widdle on, and distractions in the form of toys, and perhaps a softly playing radio, to simulate company. Build up the time the dog spends there - do not ' reward'  undesirable behaviour by giving any attention to it at all, and always make sure the dog is quiet before being let out.

Many people mistakenly believe that it' s a kindness to a dog to give it the run of the house (more space) - as long as the dog has sufficient exercise daily, this is not the case. A dog' s den is a small, contained space, and that is when it will feel the safest.

You might also consider providing the dog with company (another dog, maybe?) - only, make very sure the new dog, if you try this, doesn' t pick up the bad habit!

If you' ll google ' separation anxiety dogs' , you will find hundreds of thousands of articles - do a bit of reading, you' ll find tips that will fit your lifestyle.

Reply to Chill

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