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Question
Posted by: Depressed Concerned | 2012-07-02

Depression in the workplace .. disclose or keep quiet

Will you advice that a person with depression or bi polar disclose such information in the workplace as this is not being seen as ï llness" really in most workplaces although it is very much an ï llness" 
I am struggling with depression but I do not have a manager that will understand there are days that I really just cant cope with life and work at the same time and but because I have to come to work I do but that this cause it get even worst as my depression is starting to intervere with my work (doing the actual work) I tend to ask questions in myself during meetings " What is these people''s problems that they find this or that so important.. I tend to have an out of body experience with day to day things .. it really does not matter to me anymore. I have notice that I tend to take more off also it is really starting to filter in every aspect of my life. I am on medication I am not able to go to a shrink as I can not state what is it that worries me maybe I have a bit of a D personality not sure so sessions dont work for me.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Sadly, yes, some companies and bosses are irresponsibly ignorant about many categories of illness, and don't take them as seriously as they should, though I think they could be usefully pursued through law if they acted with prejudice.
This is worth discusing properly with your psychiatrist whop has made the diagnosis and knows more about your particular problems and the likely future outlook.
One useful way to look at this issue is to think about whether the illness will be likely to reveal itself - a mild depression, for instance, may not seriously interfere with your ability to do your work, you may well be able to keep it confidential On the other hand, if the illness is likely to be serious and might reveal itself at work, it could be useful to discuss it privately with your boss and the HR dept, explaining that you wish it to be kept confidential, and will work to ensure minimum interference with your work.
If as you say your manager is not an understanding person, is there an HR person you can talk with ?
I'm worried that you say you cannot go to a shrink because you cannot state what it is that bothers you - please don't let that limit you. IN this situation it is extremely important tjhat you see, be assessed by, and discuss all aspects of treatment, outlook, and managing the illness, with someone with the right sort of expertise to do this well.
Good shrinks are trained and experienced at helping you talk about whatever is troubling you. And if you have perhaps had a previous bad experience with a shrink or any doc, please don['t let this put you off - in any field of work some folks are not awfully good at it, but then we must just shrug and try another.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Andiphile | 2012-07-19

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Reply to Andiphile
Posted by: Stepmom | 2012-07-02

I hide my manic depression, my co worker disclosed that he was bipolar and now all the time i hear the directors say whenever something happens " oh he''s probably having an episode again"  or " you know he''s not well in the head"  or " wish he''d outgrow it"  etc. They do not understand and don''t care to educate themselves. I see when bonus and increase time comes he is also at the end of the receiving line.

I would not.

Reply to Stepmom
Posted by: Romany | 2012-07-02

I do not know about your place of work, but at the places I have worked for there has always been very little simpathy for outside influences and problems.
Yes, your problems does make good material for gossip, but no-one is realy sympathetic towards them.
There are always more that one person just waiting to step into your position and people thrive on other''s bad luck (mostly).
So, in my opinion, this has nothing to do with anyone at your work. Try and get yourself the treatment you require so you can happily carry on with your life. And yes, you can go to a shrink. he will diagnose you.

Reply to Romany
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012-07-02

Sadly, yes, some companies and bosses are irresponsibly ignorant about many categories of illness, and don't take them as seriously as they should, though I think they could be usefully pursued through law if they acted with prejudice.
This is worth discusing properly with your psychiatrist whop has made the diagnosis and knows more about your particular problems and the likely future outlook.
One useful way to look at this issue is to think about whether the illness will be likely to reveal itself - a mild depression, for instance, may not seriously interfere with your ability to do your work, you may well be able to keep it confidential On the other hand, if the illness is likely to be serious and might reveal itself at work, it could be useful to discuss it privately with your boss and the HR dept, explaining that you wish it to be kept confidential, and will work to ensure minimum interference with your work.
If as you say your manager is not an understanding person, is there an HR person you can talk with ?
I'm worried that you say you cannot go to a shrink because you cannot state what it is that bothers you - please don't let that limit you. IN this situation it is extremely important tjhat you see, be assessed by, and discuss all aspects of treatment, outlook, and managing the illness, with someone with the right sort of expertise to do this well.
Good shrinks are trained and experienced at helping you talk about whatever is troubling you. And if you have perhaps had a previous bad experience with a shrink or any doc, please don['t let this put you off - in any field of work some folks are not awfully good at it, but then we must just shrug and try another.

Reply to cybershrink

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