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Question
Posted by: D | 2010/05/04

Debate

“ Freud invented transference because he lacked the courage to fully face " the therapeutic significance"  of affection between therapist and client, that Freud ended in a bundle of contradictions on the subject, without any facts to support his claims for the existence of transference:
" Freud assumed that the feelings the analyst and the patient experienced towards each other within the analytic situation were not really relevant to each other, but rather were directed towards the father or mother or towards some other childhood figures. [The feelings were projected] in order to avoid an emergence into consciousness of persisting incestuous, painful, or shameful relationships . . . . This transference hypothesis, however, is far from touching the actual nature of the doctor-patient relationship in psychotherapy. It is a completely unwarranted intellectual construct as are many of the psychoanalytic constructs. While many therapists believe the working through of transference the essence of psychotherapy, Seguin claims the concept is " not just theoretically unprovable and untenable. [Freud''s] theoretical procedure also frequently has severe and disastrous consequences on the practical therapy. That is easy to understand, if one bears in mind that the ''transference'' hypothesis takes precisely what a patient experiences - his feelings towards the analyst - as the most authentic and valuable thing, and demotes them to the status of a mere fiction, to something inauthentic. And this with neurotics, who have already been made to doubt their feelings of self-esteem. Also deleterious for the psychotherapy is the doctor''s attempt to ''analyze away'' his own feelings of sympathy and love towards his patient, the so-called counter-transference, because he theoretically regards these too as merely ''transferred'' infantile affects which are of no import, and as even harmful in principle. Only noxious self-violation and an all-obscuring dishonesty can result"  (Seguin, 1965, p.xi).” 

Personally, I think the moment one tries to dismiss feelings as artificially induced constructs, we run into the danger that the feelings are not sufficiently understood and metabolised such that the danger of acting them out becomes a reality. As may well have happened in my case. D

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

It is also said in the literature that Freud developed the technique of the analyst sitting behind and out of sight of the patient lying on the couch, because he really did not like being looked at ; while Jung preferred the method of sitting in front of the patient because in the Fruedian position he tended to fall asleep. Of course they also developed fancy theoretical arguments in favour of the set-up they happened to find personally most comfortable. I only ever met Anna Freud, his daughter, so was unable to ask him about this.
Within analysis it can be hard at times to recognize the differences between theories and excuses.
And hence my view of the Crowded Couch - whereby, to avoid some o the grisly realities of what may actually be happening between the two flesh-and-blood people in the room, analysis drags in so many other figures - there's mom and pop, and a host of arthetypes, etc. ; that the people not actually there can crowd out those who are. And NOBODY is capable of keeping track of all those folks, real and imaginary, at the same time, so losing sight of actual real-time components.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/05/04

It is also said in the literature that Freud developed the technique of the analyst sitting behind and out of sight of the patient lying on the couch, because he really did not like being looked at ; while Jung preferred the method of sitting in front of the patient because in the Fruedian position he tended to fall asleep. Of course they also developed fancy theoretical arguments in favour of the set-up they happened to find personally most comfortable. I only ever met Anna Freud, his daughter, so was unable to ask him about this.
Within analysis it can be hard at times to recognize the differences between theories and excuses.
And hence my view of the Crowded Couch - whereby, to avoid some o the grisly realities of what may actually be happening between the two flesh-and-blood people in the room, analysis drags in so many other figures - there's mom and pop, and a host of arthetypes, etc. ; that the people not actually there can crowd out those who are. And NOBODY is capable of keeping track of all those folks, real and imaginary, at the same time, so losing sight of actual real-time components.

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