advertisement
Question
Posted by: Nonnie | 2012-05-09

Daughter bipolar?

My daughter is displaying strange behaviour and I am totally stressed out about it. She is almost 20 years of age, at university and obtaining good grades. She comes across as the live wire at social functions and with her peers, is constantly on social media. At home, she is a different person. She doesn''t talk much, just watches tv, do the occassional chore around the house and justifies this by saying that she studies hard. Recently, she has been staying at home and not attending lectures as she claims that the tutorials are compulsory, but the lectures boring. I am a single mom and pays for her and her brother''s studies. Their father committed suicide last year and I am not sure if this is still affecting her. They have both been for some counselling sessions with a psychologist. She seems to be fine over weekends and goes partying with her boyfriend, is ecstatic when I buy her stuff that she wants, but when it comes to Monday, she is back to her morose self. Her older brother is also finding it difficult and during a fight, which they have quite often now, he said that she behaves as if she is bipolar. I am involved with a good man now and she communicates with him on social media, but when he is there in person, she acts aloof. Should I take her back to a psychologist? Ironically, she is studying the very same discipline.

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Even boring lectures may be useful for one's studies. As she has been for some counselling sessions with a psychologist, you could contact the psychologist, expressing your concerns ( including the fact that her father recently committed suicide, which she might not have told her psych )and ask, though she will of course respect her patient's confidentiality, whether she will please seriously consider the risks and the concerns you have. Yes, she should see the psychologist again, and make sure he/she is aware of her recent behaviours

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

3
Our users say:
Posted by: lilo | 2012-05-09

Her dad''s suicide may be affecting her more than you thought it would. Maybe the fact that you have moved on as well has affected her. It was only last year that her dad committed suicide. The grief is still there. Everyone handles grief differently and at different paces. Some move on very easily, whilst others take longer to come to terms with it and get closure.

Did you ask her how she feels about your relationship? If her dad and you were in a relationship when he died, she may just be reacting to the fact that you have someone else in your life.

Maybe she has lost interest in studies. Maybe she wonders why, she couldn''t see her dad had a problem as she herself is a psych student and even though not a qualified psychologist, may suddenly think her studies are of no use.

Reply to lilo
Posted by: Maria | 2012-05-09

I see nothing in your story that indicates bipolar. It almost sounds as if she has lost interest in her studies. Perhaps she is scared to tell you this? You can take her back to the psychologist, maybe that will help to clarify exactly what is going on. I also suggest that you have an open and honest discussion with her about studies, as well as checking with the university what the policy is regarding class attendence. I finished a BA Psych through UNISA last year and if I could have studied fulltime and attended classes I would have jumped at the chance. If she says she does want to continue her studies then I feel you should tell her that you will only continue paying if she attends classes and gets good results. If she fails then she''s out, and must find a job to refund you for the money spent.

Reply to Maria
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012-05-09

Even boring lectures may be useful for one's studies. As she has been for some counselling sessions with a psychologist, you could contact the psychologist, expressing your concerns ( including the fact that her father recently committed suicide, which she might not have told her psych )and ask, though she will of course respect her patient's confidentiality, whether she will please seriously consider the risks and the concerns you have. Yes, she should see the psychologist again, and make sure he/she is aware of her recent behaviours

Reply to cybershrink

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement