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Question
Posted by: Eunice | 2010-12-09

Customary marriage.

I am married to my husband traditonally,Lobola has been paid but we have never registered the marriage and now he wants to divorce me.And he is telling me that i am not going to get anything from this marriage because i dont have a proof of marriage, But i do have a lobola letter to prove that we are married and we have two kids together.He said to me he is going to take everything including our house which we helped each other to build it and this property is registered under our names.Am i married to this man or the law will decline this. Please Help.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFamily law expert

The Recognition of Customary Marriages Act of 1988 now gives full legal recognition to customary marriages. Before this Act, customary marriages were not recognised by law as they can be polygamous (which is against civil law). This Act now recognises customary marriages whether they are monogamous or polygamous.

The Act says the following:

Equal status and capacity: The wife in a customary marriage is no longer regarded as a minor. She has equal status and capacity to her husband. This means she can buy and sell assets, enter into contracts and take a case to court.

Validity: Both partners to a customary marriage must consent to the marriage and they must be 18 years or older. If a person under the age of 18 wants to enter into a customary marriage, he or she must first get permission from the Minister of Home Affairs.

Registration: The marriage must be registered with a registration officer at the Department of Home Affairs. The main purpose of registering the marriage is to provide proof that a customary marriage exists, which will help the parties if any dispute arises about the validity of the marriage.

Partners in customary marriages that were entered into before the Recognition of Customary Marriages Act was passed had 12 months to apply to have their marriage registered.This period has now passed.

Property and assets:

The property systems for customary unions entered into before the Act will continue to be governed by customary law. Partners to a customary union can apply to the High Court to change the property system of their marriage. If the husband wants to enter into another customary marriage, all of the wives can ask the High Court to help them develop a new property system for their marriage. The court will try to look after the interests of all the parties by deciding how much the assets are worth and making sure that the existing wife and children get a fair deal.

All new marriages formed after the Act will automatically be in community of property unless the parties draw up an ante-nuptial contract.

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Our users say:
Posted by: baidaymob | 2011-02-02

Reply to baidaymob
Posted by: family law expert | 2010-12-16

The Recognition of Customary Marriages Act of 1988 now gives full legal recognition to customary marriages. Before this Act, customary marriages were not recognised by law as they can be polygamous (which is against civil law). This Act now recognises customary marriages whether they are monogamous or polygamous.

The Act says the following:

Equal status and capacity: The wife in a customary marriage is no longer regarded as a minor. She has equal status and capacity to her husband. This means she can buy and sell assets, enter into contracts and take a case to court.

Validity: Both partners to a customary marriage must consent to the marriage and they must be 18 years or older. If a person under the age of 18 wants to enter into a customary marriage, he or she must first get permission from the Minister of Home Affairs.

Registration: The marriage must be registered with a registration officer at the Department of Home Affairs. The main purpose of registering the marriage is to provide proof that a customary marriage exists, which will help the parties if any dispute arises about the validity of the marriage.

Partners in customary marriages that were entered into before the Recognition of Customary Marriages Act was passed had 12 months to apply to have their marriage registered.This period has now passed.

Property and assets:

The property systems for customary unions entered into before the Act will continue to be governed by customary law. Partners to a customary union can apply to the High Court to change the property system of their marriage. If the husband wants to enter into another customary marriage, all of the wives can ask the High Court to help them develop a new property system for their marriage. The court will try to look after the interests of all the parties by deciding how much the assets are worth and making sure that the existing wife and children get a fair deal.

All new marriages formed after the Act will automatically be in community of property unless the parties draw up an ante-nuptial contract.

Reply to family law expert
Posted by: Neo | 2010-12-10

You are legally married and the law will recognise it if you have those letters.

Reply to Neo

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