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Question
Posted by: Riki | 2010/04/12

crying in my heart..

My dauhter in law is 23 years old and was diagnosed with MS 5months after her baby was born, I cry everytime I think about the family, my son and grandchild, my heart cry everytime I see them, the baby gets looked after by her Mom during the week, then I take him weekends, he is still so small, and already his Mom is not with him, when she is in hospital, she went for a MRI scan this morning for her neck, she is blind in the left eye...still might come right with the right medicine, I am so sorry for her, she is heavily sedated with all the pain meds...pse someone tell me what will happen in the future, they are so young....

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

It is the absolute duty of the doctors who made the diagnosis to discuss this fully with the woman herself, and with her family, so you can all understand how this illness can affect her, what she may or may not need in the way of help, and what can be done to help her. Maybe they're wanting the results of tests to be sure of what is happening before discussing it, but don't let them evade that responsibility - see them and ask.
As I recall it was far more common in the Northern hemisphere than in the southern, so people and health care in SA tends to have less experience of dealing with this condition. More than most illnesses, it is characterised by ( neurological ) symptoms which come and go - which can become really severe and troubling for a time, and then improve. Usually it does not involve significant pain, or the need for pain meds, so its important to hear exactly from her treating docs what is happening. Similarly, even very severe pain, of whatever cause, can usually be helped by proper expertise in pain control, and usually without major sedation. The local hospice which has paticular expertise in this field, could perhaps advise.

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: Been there | 2010/04/12

Hi there,

My twin sister was diagnosed with MS two weeks ago. Your daughter in law will be ok. She will get her sight back, that''s how MS works. My sister lost the sight in both her eyes now but it''s slowly coming back, she lost the sight in her one eye about 12 years ago and that also came right then. The neurologist my sister sees is actively involved in the clinical trials for MS and reckons there will be a cure available in SA in 3 years that will reverse the damage. We also have a friend who was diagnosed with MS 13 years ago (he is 49 now) and he still lives a very full, very active life. All is not lost, don''t dispair. Your daughter in law will be ok adn things will go back to normal again soonish. If you want to chat more, let me know, I''ll give you my e-mial address.
Good luck !

Reply to Been there
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/04/12

It is the absolute duty of the doctors who made the diagnosis to discuss this fully with the woman herself, and with her family, so you can all understand how this illness can affect her, what she may or may not need in the way of help, and what can be done to help her. Maybe they're wanting the results of tests to be sure of what is happening before discussing it, but don't let them evade that responsibility - see them and ask.
As I recall it was far more common in the Northern hemisphere than in the southern, so people and health care in SA tends to have less experience of dealing with this condition. More than most illnesses, it is characterised by ( neurological ) symptoms which come and go - which can become really severe and troubling for a time, and then improve. Usually it does not involve significant pain, or the need for pain meds, so its important to hear exactly from her treating docs what is happening. Similarly, even very severe pain, of whatever cause, can usually be helped by proper expertise in pain control, and usually without major sedation. The local hospice which has paticular expertise in this field, could perhaps advise.

Reply to cybershrink

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