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Question
Posted by: Mother | 2010/10/13

Concerta

If concerta is used for a medical reason - not for the normal use
and it is so diagnosed by n nurologist then can it still be used in sport or is it a band substance - my daughter can not function
propery without it and sometimes losses al muscle controle for a minute or so - and in the sport she is partisipating - that could be seriously dangerous. I do not want to eloborate to much about the problem as I dont want to give any ideas to cheeters out there. She has been on it for almost a year and is now at Provincial level with her sport. - I was horrified to hear she might get into trouble.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFitnessDoc

Hi there

Interesting question. I must confess I'm not 100% sure of the answer. It's obviously a serious issue, and so I don't want to mislead you with my answer, and so what I'm going to do is send your question to the South African Institute for Drug Free Sport, and get the answer from the decision makers. That way it's not just my opinion.

I can tell you that therapeutic use exemptions are sometimes given to athletes if the athlete can prove they have a medical condition which prevents them from functioning normally. For example, a lot of athletes use asthma medication, but they must first prove that they have it.

The World Anti Doping agency has four criteria for giving out these TUEs. The athlete has to show that without the drug, their health would be affected. They also have to show that the drug doesn't give them an advantage, but only returns them to their normal level. Third, they have to show that there is no alternative to the drug (that is, a substitute that might not be banned), and finally, that the need for the drug wasn't caused by drug use in the first place.

So, for your daughter, the challenge is in point 2 especially. Methlyphenidate is the active drug in Concerta, and it is on the banned list. So I am going to mail the experts, and see what they say. Hopefully I get a reply in a day or so, and I'll come back to this post and paste it in for you.

Regards
Ross

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: Ross Tucker | 2010/10/19

Hi again

Right, so I have the expert opinion, right out of anti-doping themselves.

It is possible to get a therapeutic use exemption for methylphenidate (Concerta). What needs to happen is that a psychiatrist needs to assess your daughter and make the ADHD diagnosis. This has probably already happened, if she is being given the prescription.

Once done, that psychiatrist signs off that your daughter has the condition, and the federation in question (I''m not sure what sport it is) decides whether or not they will accept it. I see no reason that they would not. I think what you need to do is contact that federation and talk to them first, build that relationship. Then you go to the psychiatrist who diagnosed ADHD and obtain the official diagnosis. You then submit the TUE. If you sent it out of the blue, it would be more likely to cause some problems.

Good luck!
Ross

Reply to Ross Tucker
Posted by: fitnessdoc | 2010/10/18

Hi there

Interesting question. I must confess I'm not 100% sure of the answer. It's obviously a serious issue, and so I don't want to mislead you with my answer, and so what I'm going to do is send your question to the South African Institute for Drug Free Sport, and get the answer from the decision makers. That way it's not just my opinion.

I can tell you that therapeutic use exemptions are sometimes given to athletes if the athlete can prove they have a medical condition which prevents them from functioning normally. For example, a lot of athletes use asthma medication, but they must first prove that they have it.

The World Anti Doping agency has four criteria for giving out these TUEs. The athlete has to show that without the drug, their health would be affected. They also have to show that the drug doesn't give them an advantage, but only returns them to their normal level. Third, they have to show that there is no alternative to the drug (that is, a substitute that might not be banned), and finally, that the need for the drug wasn't caused by drug use in the first place.

So, for your daughter, the challenge is in point 2 especially. Methlyphenidate is the active drug in Concerta, and it is on the banned list. So I am going to mail the experts, and see what they say. Hopefully I get a reply in a day or so, and I'll come back to this post and paste it in for you.

Regards
Ross

Reply to fitnessdoc

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