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Question
Posted by: Debbie | 2010-05-17

Cocaine Addiction

I have met a man who says he has been clean for 14 months now after a fairly severe, but not long term cocaine addiction. I understand that this affects your personality and you have extreme mood swings while you are using. Is it possible to have these mood swings after you have stopped using the drug? I other words, one day you are wonderful and loving and caring, and the following day you can act as though you have never met that person. Or is this possibly a sign that this person may still be using drugs? How does intake of alcohol after quiting a drug addiction affect you?

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Our expert says:
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Greetings Debbie

If a person stops using drugs he/she should not use alcohol at all. Moreover, you should not use any mind altering substance.

Your man was addicted to cocaine, therefore he is an addict. Addicts cannot stop using one drug and then simply switch over to another (alcohol).

They're then simply cross-addicting, although many addicts will find all sorts of wonderful reason why they can drink.

But let's look at his erratic behaviour: it certainly doesn't sound good. He might be using, you are right.

On the other hand he might just be suffering from mood swings and dry drunk behaviour. Google Dry Drunk Behaviour and read up about it.

In AA it refers to someone who has stopped drinking, but still has all the characteristics of a drunk.

Unpleasant, aggressive, bombastic, grandiose, resentful, you name it.

Is you partner attending any NA meetings? If not, this might explain his moodiness. He cannot do his recovery on his own, because this is what happens.

Your old behaviour starts creeping back and the next step is most probably a relapse.

If he is using, there is not much you can do about it really. Perhaps you can confront him in a nice way, but it will most probably lead to a huge drama, with his mood swings and so forth.

His recovery is his responsibility. Address his mood swings and suggest that he sees his doctor about it.

Also suggest that he attends some NA meetings, it will help. If he refuses, so be it. Don't become co-dependent and make it your problem.

There are other more interesting things to do than to worry about an addict, believe me.

herman@harmonyclinic.co.za

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Addictions Expert Forum | 2010-05-18

Greetings Debbie

If a person stops using drugs he/she should not use alcohol at all. Moreover, you should not use any mind altering substance.

Your man was addicted to cocaine, therefore he is an addict. Addicts cannot stop using one drug and then simply switch over to another (alcohol).

They're then simply cross-addicting, although many addicts will find all sorts of wonderful reason why they can drink.

But let's look at his erratic behaviour: it certainly doesn't sound good. He might be using, you are right.

On the other hand he might just be suffering from mood swings and dry drunk behaviour. Google Dry Drunk Behaviour and read up about it.

In AA it refers to someone who has stopped drinking, but still has all the characteristics of a drunk.

Unpleasant, aggressive, bombastic, grandiose, resentful, you name it.

Is you partner attending any NA meetings? If not, this might explain his moodiness. He cannot do his recovery on his own, because this is what happens.

Your old behaviour starts creeping back and the next step is most probably a relapse.

If he is using, there is not much you can do about it really. Perhaps you can confront him in a nice way, but it will most probably lead to a huge drama, with his mood swings and so forth.

His recovery is his responsibility. Address his mood swings and suggest that he sees his doctor about it.

Also suggest that he attends some NA meetings, it will help. If he refuses, so be it. Don't become co-dependent and make it your problem.

There are other more interesting things to do than to worry about an addict, believe me.

herman@harmonyclinic.co.za

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