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Question
Posted by: Cupcake. | 2010/05/31

Clear and present.

Dear Sir.

I have BMD 2. That is not the problem though since it has been kept in check for many years now. Yes I get depressed but that''s normal and I deal with it. The sun always comes up again.

The problem is that I sometimes get periods (usually a few days to weeks at a time followed by months of normality), when I see things happen that isn''t happening. They used to last split seconds, just a flash, but now last several seconds at a time. It happens in public, not when I''m by myself. Especially when I''m driving. I find myself staring into space, still aware of where I am but watching the scenes playing off in front of me. They are very clear and full of emotion, color and sound.

I sometimes feel like crying after one of these as they are always sad and/or scary. Carnage. Death.

I have discussed this with several psychiatrists and psychologists but no-one can give me any clear answers.

Thanks for your time.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Hmmm. Well, this doesn't sound like one of the routine, run-of-the-mill phenomena. But it might yield to a careful examination and assessment by an unusually good psychiatrist, perhaps an academic at one of our better University Departments of Psychiatry.
There's a whole field, generally neglected in SA and out of fashion these days when only super-large and complex drug, chemical and brain-scan research is fashionable, of Phenomenology which still interests me, which includes carefully examining all the details of unusual mental phenomena so as to more usefully identify what they are and represent.
Off the cuff, these sound to me like dissociative phenomena, like variants of day-dreaming, and it is significant and comforting that though they include seeing things than aren't really "out there", you recognize that they are not real. And the emotional components may represent more of the sadness associated with your depressions, which is perhaps more accessable on such occasions, rather than caused by them.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/05/31

Hmmm. Well, this doesn't sound like one of the routine, run-of-the-mill phenomena. But it might yield to a careful examination and assessment by an unusually good psychiatrist, perhaps an academic at one of our better University Departments of Psychiatry.
There's a whole field, generally neglected in SA and out of fashion these days when only super-large and complex drug, chemical and brain-scan research is fashionable, of Phenomenology which still interests me, which includes carefully examining all the details of unusual mental phenomena so as to more usefully identify what they are and represent.
Off the cuff, these sound to me like dissociative phenomena, like variants of day-dreaming, and it is significant and comforting that though they include seeing things than aren't really "out there", you recognize that they are not real. And the emotional components may represent more of the sadness associated with your depressions, which is perhaps more accessable on such occasions, rather than caused by them.

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