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Question
Posted by: MB | 2010/03/11

Childhood depression

Manic depression is a problem on my husband''s side of the family - my mother-in-law is bipolar (whether it''s tipe I or II I''m not sure). My husband is also on 10mg Lexamil, Wellbirtrons &  Zolpadem to treat his depression &  sleeping problems.
Recently our 7 year old son started showing signs of depression as well. He has ADD &  has started Gr. 1 this year. The transition from Gr. 0 to Gr. 1 seemed to have been too much for him &  he started making remarks about feeling worthless &  too dumb for Gr. 1 work. I was shocked to hear this from my small child!
Our GP recommended pshyciatric help if he doesn''t improve within 6 months   the private remedial school he attends has a panel of expert therapists who all recommended we try therapy with the school psycologist &  a change in diet first. The nutritional expert advised that because of my husband''s family history of depression &  the fact that I have inherited the family condition IBS, may explain the problem: he has a seritonine deficiency as this enzyme is manufactured in the intestines. They requested we try to help him via the school''s resources &  give them 6 months to help him before we consider psychiatric help &  anti-depressions because of his age.
How can I help my child, emotionally &  dietary? I feel totally helpless.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I know of no good evidence that manipulating the diet is distinctly helpful in such situations, however there's also no evidence that it is harmful, unless one relies on it INSTEAD of more orthodox and established treatments.
It sounds to me as though the first priority is to arange for him to see a good local child psychiatrist for assessment and diagnosis, as its foolish for anyone to opine about treatment withou a reliable and expert diagnosis ( its like deciding on a dish to cook for supper without knowing what ingredients are available ).
YOu don't mention what variety of "experts" the school draws on, but I wonder, if they so emphasize unproven nutritional factors, whether they are recognized and registered specialists in mental health and pediatrics, rather than adgerents of more fringe concerns.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/03/11

I know of no good evidence that manipulating the diet is distinctly helpful in such situations, however there's also no evidence that it is harmful, unless one relies on it INSTEAD of more orthodox and established treatments.
It sounds to me as though the first priority is to arange for him to see a good local child psychiatrist for assessment and diagnosis, as its foolish for anyone to opine about treatment withou a reliable and expert diagnosis ( its like deciding on a dish to cook for supper without knowing what ingredients are available ).
YOu don't mention what variety of "experts" the school draws on, but I wonder, if they so emphasize unproven nutritional factors, whether they are recognized and registered specialists in mental health and pediatrics, rather than adgerents of more fringe concerns.

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