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Question
Posted by: Me. | 2010-10-19

CBT.

Dear sir.

I have BMD. What are the chances that I can quit my meds and replace it with proper CBT? I''m very stable and have been for many years. I just need to know. I would love not having to rely on pills to function normally.

Thanks.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Hmm. I'm really not familiar with the abbreviation "BMD", which usually refers to Births, Marriages and Deaths" which tend to get registered in the BMD office, but I'm guessing this is not what you "have"
Perhaps you mean Bipolar Mood Disorder ? The question you ask is really not practical to answer online, as so much would depend on so many more details tan we can exchange here. That you have been very stable for many years is splendid. You'd need to ask the Psychiatrist who presumably should be monitoring your medication to what extnt and in what way it would be safe and desirable to gradually come of at least some of the meds.
Meanwhile, there's nothing at all to stop you from beginning proper CBT anyway. Generally, CBT is excellent in treating basic Depression, and can help a Bipolar person to control many of the symptoms better, but doesn't really control the major mood swings in the long term - that is where long-term mood-stabilizers may remain useful.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010-10-19

Hmm. I'm really not familiar with the abbreviation "BMD", which usually refers to Births, Marriages and Deaths" which tend to get registered in the BMD office, but I'm guessing this is not what you "have"
Perhaps you mean Bipolar Mood Disorder ? The question you ask is really not practical to answer online, as so much would depend on so many more details tan we can exchange here. That you have been very stable for many years is splendid. You'd need to ask the Psychiatrist who presumably should be monitoring your medication to what extnt and in what way it would be safe and desirable to gradually come of at least some of the meds.
Meanwhile, there's nothing at all to stop you from beginning proper CBT anyway. Generally, CBT is excellent in treating basic Depression, and can help a Bipolar person to control many of the symptoms better, but doesn't really control the major mood swings in the long term - that is where long-term mood-stabilizers may remain useful.

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