advertisement
Question
Posted by: M | 2010/02/03

CBT

CS. Is there something available on-line? As in CBT online? Money is always the determining factor isnt it? If one sees a therapist, it is going to cost a bit. R500 a session is the average price. If you go for 10 sessions....then you hope that it worked. I dont have the money for 1 session, nevermind 10. I know, how important is it? But to get to the point where I believe I can earn a decent living, I have to get help....circle. And it is always like that....something has to change before you can make progress. Why is it easy for some people and so hard for others? Does one get addicted to trouble? But then it is the same again....help needed to make progress. When do you know if someone is really going to make the change or when are they just wasting your time?

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

It'd be excellent, and there have indeed been research projects showing that for some basic applications, such as anxiety and depression, on-line administration works well. I think one Dept of Psychiatriy in the UK sells DVDs of a self-help version.
One hopeful development is further studies into both training less highly qualified people, nurses, and even nursing aides, to administer routine CBT, which seems to be effective if they are properly trained and work to properly organized schedules ; and also using CBT in groups ( which obviously increases availability and lowers costs ).
One reason I punt CBT, and remain consistently scornful about psychoanalytically-oriented "therapy" is that while the first has been shown in a goo deal of good research to be egfective and with lasting benefits, in around 10 sessions, the latter has NEVER been shown in ANY good research to be effective, and can last for years at enormous cost.
There are some useful self-help books in this format which one might try. Some have been tested and found to be effective. They won't achieve everything one might manage with personal CBT tailored to your specific needs, but they are a lot more useful than nothing, in the meantime

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/02/03

It'd be excellent, and there have indeed been research projects showing that for some basic applications, such as anxiety and depression, on-line administration works well. I think one Dept of Psychiatriy in the UK sells DVDs of a self-help version.
One hopeful development is further studies into both training less highly qualified people, nurses, and even nursing aides, to administer routine CBT, which seems to be effective if they are properly trained and work to properly organized schedules ; and also using CBT in groups ( which obviously increases availability and lowers costs ).
One reason I punt CBT, and remain consistently scornful about psychoanalytically-oriented "therapy" is that while the first has been shown in a goo deal of good research to be egfective and with lasting benefits, in around 10 sessions, the latter has NEVER been shown in ANY good research to be effective, and can last for years at enormous cost.
There are some useful self-help books in this format which one might try. Some have been tested and found to be effective. They won't achieve everything one might manage with personal CBT tailored to your specific needs, but they are a lot more useful than nothing, in the meantime

Reply to cybershrink

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement