advertisement
Question
Posted by: angry mom | 2010/06/08

cats - how do i handle this?

We live in a ground floor apartment with a nice garden and lots of trees around us for our 2 cats to play around. We moved here in december. From the start there's this big black cat coming here and ALWAYS fighting with my cats.

He comes into our grounds and literally attacks them. at the start he actually came into the house through the window a few times and attacked my cats. My cats aren't that big and he TORTURES them. My baby has probably 20 scabs on his body at the moment (often he comes in here covered in blood), and the older one has 5 different slashes on his nose at the moment and last night his eye was hurt.

It was actually bleeding and with puss and he couldnt open his eye. My husband just wants to put poison out, but now im obviously thinking, this is still someone else's cat.

I really don't know what to do anymore. Obviously they're gonna protect themselves and fight back, I mean it's their territory, right? I always keep an apple or lemon on the porch to throw at him, but obviously it doesnt help and in my heart I don't want to hurt him.

Has anyone been in this situation and what did you do? I'm so tired of running out almost every night/morning to ''scare'' them, and obviously it's not working either. I don't know where the cat's home is.

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Hi Angry Mom

What you can try:
a) Get a magnetic cat flap to put on your door/window. This will only permit your cats to enter your property and provide a safe environment away from attack. There are new cat flaps available that recognise microchips that are implanted below the cats skin, however these can be expensive.
b)Make sure that you feed your animals inside
c)Try an introduce a deterrent - I would suggest spraying the cat with water from a hose pipe / water pistol. Maybe even try water balloons e.t.c.

Information duplicated from another web site

Cat Deterrents for your Garden:

Keep in mind that each cat is different (like people), a deterrent that works for one may not necessarily work for another. On the plus side, most cats will keep pesty squirrels, moles and other critters out of your garden. They're great for keeping out moles, rabbits, squirrels, and other critters which can do more damage in your garden than a cat ever will. If the cats have owners, talk to them without being confrontational. The cat owner who allows his cat to damage other peoples' property is as guilty as the cat hater who kills the cat for trespassing. Remember, cats will be cats, and it is unfair of us to blame them for being what they are and how nature intended them to participate in this world. After-all, we praise them when they catch mice or rats or other creatures we deem to be 'pests'.

* amonia soaked (corncobs, etc)
* aluminum foil
* bamboo skewers
* black pepper
* blood meal fertilizer
* bramble cuttings
* Carefresh - "recycled" wood pulp
* catnip - donated into your neighbor's yards (so they'll stay in their own yards)
* cedar compost
* chicken wire (metal or plastic)
* cinnamon
* citrus peels
* citrus spray
* cocoa bean shells
* coffee grounds -fresh & unbrewed, not just a light sprinkling (highly recommended by MANY Gardenwebbers!)
* dogs
* electric fence for animals
* essence of orange. essence of lemon, lime (citrus essential oils)
* fresh manure(ditto)
* garlic cloves
* gumballs from the Sweet Gum Tree
* gutter covers
* hardware cloth
* heavy bark mulch
* holly leaves
* keep the area damp, they like dry soil
* lavender
* liquid manure (good for your garden too)
* motion sensor sprinkler
* pennyroyal
* pinecones
* pipe tobacco
* plastic forks
* predator urine
* red wine vinegar
* river rocks over the exposed soil
* rocks, crushed
* rose bush clippings
* rue, an herb (Ruta graveolens) (highly recommended in plant form only)
* short twigs throughout the planted area about 6" apart
* six-inch bamboo skewers (pointy side up)
* Spray on your leaves (not the cat): fill a spray bottle with 1/2 t chili powder, 1/2 t cayenne pepper, 1 t dish soap and water
* squirt gun with water
* talk to your neighbors
* tansy
* thorny berry, lilac, hawthorn, rose clippings
* toothpicks
* upside down vinyl carpet
* vinegar sprayed on areas where they roam
* water bottle on "stream"

NOT RECOMMENDED:
*** chili powder, red crushed pepper, cayenne pepper (NOT recommended), it gets on the cat's paws then they wash themselves and they get it in their eyes, beware cats have literally scratched their eyes out because of this. Even if it's one cat out of 500 infected in this way, that's one too many for me.
*** Don't ever use mothballs or flakes. Those little toxic waste pellets destroy cats' kidney function, could seriously harm people who handle them, and yes, contaminate your own garden soil. Their packaging even warns against using them this way.

Give them their own areas:

(To keep them out of where you don't want them)
(If you don't mind them protecting your garden from other critters)

+ pick the cat up and bring it to eye level with the plant to see and smell it up close. She noted that once her cat has seen and sniffed at the plant, she usually doesn't bother with it later.

+ give them their own plants - i.e., pots of grass for her to chew on and a place in a large planted container on her balcony with some miscanthus grass in it (the cat likes to curl up in that for some reason)

+ if the cats are strictly indoors and attracted to your houseplants, grow catgrass for them. If someone forced you to remain inside one enclosed structure all your life, you might be attracted to the plants too.

+ Barley Grass
+ Any type of "catgrass" from the pet store
+ Carex elata 'Bolwes Golden' but put it in some shade
+ Catmint Nepeta mussinicultivars (Simply put, Catmints are Catnips without any culinary or feline use. In any case, they are, however, phenomenal, long flowering, hardy perennials that belong in every fairie or flower garden.)
+ Catnip Nepeta cataria (in your own yard) The oils of which also work as a mosquito repellent that works 10 times better than Deet! Catmint is the common name for all varieties of Nepeta. Catnip is the common name for the specific variety of Nepeta called nepeta cataria, which is the variety that cats are most attracted to.
+ Cat Thyme (Teucrium marum)
+ Flax
+ Oat Grass
+ Jacob's Ladder
+ Lemon Grass
+ Loose soil and mulch like small bark mulch
+ Mints
+ Purple Fountain Grass so the cat lays in the long leaves all day. Maybe put something in that the cats really like and - you know cats won't winky were they like to hang out.
+ Sandy area
+ Silver vine (Actinidia polygama)
+ Striped Ribbon Grass (can be invasive)
+ Sweet grass
+ Trificum aestivum (type of cat grass)
+ Various Varieties of Cat Mints (Catnips)
+ Wheat Grass
+ Wheat Berries
+ Valerian






The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

3
Our users say:
Posted by: Erna Speed | 2010/07/15

Good Morning,
I live in duplex and neighbour on the right has now got 4 cats and neighbour on the left has 1. I used to garden for the birds and have now completely given up due to these annoying cats.
Should I leave my garden door or front door open - some of these cats would come in - the one just loves sharpening his nails on the side of the one couch and I have also caught one sleeping on a bed upstairs. I have given this much thought and know that both these neighours would take offence if I should tell them about my dislike regarding their own cats behaviours ................. so, I have gone to the Lion Park and got plenty lion-dung and have put all of this evil smelling stuff all around my own boundary around the front and back. In the first week I only saw two cats and now after 3 1/2 weeks - I have not seen any cats ...... outside or inside......... I wonder if they still live next door??
If this ''project'' of mine goes wrong in any way and nastiniss comes out - I still have all the cat pooo that I dug up everywhere in the garden, stored in a big plastic bag - to throw back into the cat owners garden.
I still need to make a plan for when the horrible mating season starts for these cats.........and its always at night. ANY ideas?

Reply to Erna Speed
Posted by: mb | 2010/06/08

A friend of mine was in the exact same situation, and she and her husband eventually caught the offending cat and took it to the SPCA. They hired a cage from someone (not sure who, but it was somewhere in Pretoria). You put food in the cage, and when the food is disturbed, the cage closes.

The problem, as you say, is that you don''t know if it is someone else''s cat. The fact that you''ve had this problem since you''ve moved in means that the cat was previously used to your garden being part of its territory, and considers your cats as intruders. It now needs to learn that he is no longer welcome.

A harmless way of chasing the cat off is to spray it with water. Cats absolutely hate this, and it won''t hurt him, just hopefully convey the message that he''ll get wet every time he goes into your yard. (I''ve also heard that spraying them with citronella works, but I''ve never tried it)

My folks also had this problem. It turned out that the cat (who kept fighting with their cats, eating their food and sleeping in their house) lived two houses down, but its owners had 5 Alsatians and the cat was petrified of them, so he just " moved in"  with my parents. My parents ended up feeding him in a corner of the garden, and he learned that if he stuck to his corner, he would get food and attention. It improved the situation, but it only resolved completely when the people moved.

If possible, try locking your cats in at night - they''ll get used to it eventually, and at least you won''t have to worry about late night fights.

Good luck, it''s a very tough situation!!

Reply to mb
Posted by: CyberVet | 2010/06/08

Hi Angry Mom

What you can try:
a) Get a magnetic cat flap to put on your door/window. This will only permit your cats to enter your property and provide a safe environment away from attack. There are new cat flaps available that recognise microchips that are implanted below the cats skin, however these can be expensive.
b)Make sure that you feed your animals inside
c)Try an introduce a deterrent - I would suggest spraying the cat with water from a hose pipe / water pistol. Maybe even try water balloons e.t.c.

Information duplicated from another web site

Cat Deterrents for your Garden:

Keep in mind that each cat is different (like people), a deterrent that works for one may not necessarily work for another. On the plus side, most cats will keep pesty squirrels, moles and other critters out of your garden. They're great for keeping out moles, rabbits, squirrels, and other critters which can do more damage in your garden than a cat ever will. If the cats have owners, talk to them without being confrontational. The cat owner who allows his cat to damage other peoples' property is as guilty as the cat hater who kills the cat for trespassing. Remember, cats will be cats, and it is unfair of us to blame them for being what they are and how nature intended them to participate in this world. After-all, we praise them when they catch mice or rats or other creatures we deem to be 'pests'.

* amonia soaked (corncobs, etc)
* aluminum foil
* bamboo skewers
* black pepper
* blood meal fertilizer
* bramble cuttings
* Carefresh - "recycled" wood pulp
* catnip - donated into your neighbor's yards (so they'll stay in their own yards)
* cedar compost
* chicken wire (metal or plastic)
* cinnamon
* citrus peels
* citrus spray
* cocoa bean shells
* coffee grounds -fresh & unbrewed, not just a light sprinkling (highly recommended by MANY Gardenwebbers!)
* dogs
* electric fence for animals
* essence of orange. essence of lemon, lime (citrus essential oils)
* fresh manure(ditto)
* garlic cloves
* gumballs from the Sweet Gum Tree
* gutter covers
* hardware cloth
* heavy bark mulch
* holly leaves
* keep the area damp, they like dry soil
* lavender
* liquid manure (good for your garden too)
* motion sensor sprinkler
* pennyroyal
* pinecones
* pipe tobacco
* plastic forks
* predator urine
* red wine vinegar
* river rocks over the exposed soil
* rocks, crushed
* rose bush clippings
* rue, an herb (Ruta graveolens) (highly recommended in plant form only)
* short twigs throughout the planted area about 6" apart
* six-inch bamboo skewers (pointy side up)
* Spray on your leaves (not the cat): fill a spray bottle with 1/2 t chili powder, 1/2 t cayenne pepper, 1 t dish soap and water
* squirt gun with water
* talk to your neighbors
* tansy
* thorny berry, lilac, hawthorn, rose clippings
* toothpicks
* upside down vinyl carpet
* vinegar sprayed on areas where they roam
* water bottle on "stream"

NOT RECOMMENDED:
*** chili powder, red crushed pepper, cayenne pepper (NOT recommended), it gets on the cat's paws then they wash themselves and they get it in their eyes, beware cats have literally scratched their eyes out because of this. Even if it's one cat out of 500 infected in this way, that's one too many for me.
*** Don't ever use mothballs or flakes. Those little toxic waste pellets destroy cats' kidney function, could seriously harm people who handle them, and yes, contaminate your own garden soil. Their packaging even warns against using them this way.

Give them their own areas:

(To keep them out of where you don't want them)
(If you don't mind them protecting your garden from other critters)

+ pick the cat up and bring it to eye level with the plant to see and smell it up close. She noted that once her cat has seen and sniffed at the plant, she usually doesn't bother with it later.

+ give them their own plants - i.e., pots of grass for her to chew on and a place in a large planted container on her balcony with some miscanthus grass in it (the cat likes to curl up in that for some reason)

+ if the cats are strictly indoors and attracted to your houseplants, grow catgrass for them. If someone forced you to remain inside one enclosed structure all your life, you might be attracted to the plants too.

+ Barley Grass
+ Any type of "catgrass" from the pet store
+ Carex elata 'Bolwes Golden' but put it in some shade
+ Catmint Nepeta mussinicultivars (Simply put, Catmints are Catnips without any culinary or feline use. In any case, they are, however, phenomenal, long flowering, hardy perennials that belong in every fairie or flower garden.)
+ Catnip Nepeta cataria (in your own yard) The oils of which also work as a mosquito repellent that works 10 times better than Deet! Catmint is the common name for all varieties of Nepeta. Catnip is the common name for the specific variety of Nepeta called nepeta cataria, which is the variety that cats are most attracted to.
+ Cat Thyme (Teucrium marum)
+ Flax
+ Oat Grass
+ Jacob's Ladder
+ Lemon Grass
+ Loose soil and mulch like small bark mulch
+ Mints
+ Purple Fountain Grass so the cat lays in the long leaves all day. Maybe put something in that the cats really like and - you know cats won't winky were they like to hang out.
+ Sandy area
+ Silver vine (Actinidia polygama)
+ Striped Ribbon Grass (can be invasive)
+ Sweet grass
+ Trificum aestivum (type of cat grass)
+ Various Varieties of Cat Mints (Catnips)
+ Wheat Grass
+ Wheat Berries
+ Valerian






Reply to CyberVet

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement