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Question
Posted by: amile | 2012-08-02

can i reserve or freeze my eggs

hi,

i am 31 and single. i am afraid that by the time i try to fall pregnant i will have a problem with my eggs. is it possible to do something to preserve the production of the eggs? also, is there something specific one can do to ensure by the time i want to fall pregnant i do not have funny complications that i could have prevented whilst not trying to conceive? moreover, i have the hi virus and aware that conceiving will not happen via the traditional sex route.

i have had a couple of worrisome infections in my uterus:
1. i used to have pains that the dr said were cause by my uterus falling backwards.
2. i have had cysts that will disappear on their own or through antibiotics.
3. u sually have bladder infections either before or after my persiods.
4. i used to have strong period pain, but teh dr ended up not diagnosing as something unusual...i dont have teh pains as strong as they used to be.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFertility expert

Dear Amlie
Preservation of eggs or oocytes through a process called vitrification is possible. This involves stimulation with injections and getting the ovaries to produce a number of eggs which are then retrieved trans vaginally or through the vagina. However, once these eggs have been obtained it can then be frozen for future use. The success of thawing or fertilizing these eggs remains debatable and depends on the experience and expertise of the individual fertility centre. Some institutions have a pregnancy rate of 20%-25% has been reported per embryo transfer following virtrification and thawing. In other centres pregnancy rates have been extremely poor and the overall expected conception rate would be between 10%-15% using this procedure. However there is a substantial difference between oocytes or egg freezing and embryo freezing. If you are already married and your partner feels the same you can produce embryos and freeze these embryos rather than just freezing eggs. Frozen embryo pregnancy rates are approximately that of fresh embryos and in your situation, it would be in the region of 40%-60%. In the interim I would strongly advise you to have a thorough gynaecological check up; through a LAPAROSCOPY procedure to determine what extent of damage has already been caused through infection or other conditions so as to have a better perspective on your future fertility.
Answered by: Dr M.I.Cassim

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: Fertility Expert | 2012-08-06

Dear Amlie
Preservation of eggs or oocytes through a process called vitrification is possible. This involves stimulation with injections and getting the ovaries to produce a number of eggs which are then retrieved trans vaginally or through the vagina. However, once these eggs have been obtained it can then be frozen for future use. The success of thawing or fertilizing these eggs remains debatable and depends on the experience and expertise of the individual fertility centre. Some institutions have a pregnancy rate of 20%-25% has been reported per embryo transfer following virtrification and thawing. In other centres pregnancy rates have been extremely poor and the overall expected conception rate would be between 10%-15% using this procedure. However there is a substantial difference between oocytes or egg freezing and embryo freezing. If you are already married and your partner feels the same you can produce embryos and freeze these embryos rather than just freezing eggs. Frozen embryo pregnancy rates are approximately that of fresh embryos and in your situation, it would be in the region of 40%-60%. In the interim I would strongly advise you to have a thorough gynaecological check up; through a LAPAROSCOPY procedure to determine what extent of damage has already been caused through infection or other conditions so as to have a better perspective on your future fertility.
Answered by: Dr M.I.Cassim

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