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Question
Posted by: Maria | 2012/10/01

Breakfast protein

My daughter is 10 and eats chocolate Pronutro on most school mornings. My understanding is that adding a protein to this will increase her concentration level during the school day, is this correct? Can you give me examples of what I can add? A boiled egg could work, what about cheese or nuts? What should the portion sizes be?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageDietDoc

Dear Maria
Adding protein to a cereal product such as chocolate Pronutro will lower the GI of the meal and help to keep your daughter's blood sugar and insulin levels steady for longer which should in turn help her to concentrate for longer, but not for the whole day either. People tend to forget that milk and yoghurt, cheese and cottage cheese, are among the best sources of protein available and on top of that these dairy foods contain our best source of bioavailable calcium. So by adding 1.2 to 1 cup of milk or yoghurt to your daughter's cereal you are already adding protein and lowering the GI of the meal to keep her blood sugar and insulin levels steady for the morning. You can also give her a slice of low-GI bread with a boiled egg, or cheese or peanut butter. All these foods (flavoured milk, yoghurt, cottage cheese, other cheeses, low-GI bread, nuts, raisins, dried fruit, boiled egg, cooked chicken or tuna or cooked legumes (lentils, beans, soya) can be used to make snacks for a child's lunchbox to ensure that their sugar and insulin levels remain steady for the entire school day so that they can perform at their very best. The portion sizes for milk/yoghurt are 1/2 to 1 cup; for cereal 1/2 cup; bread 1-2 slices; other cheeses, dried fruit, peanut butter or other nuts 30 g or 2 tablespoons; egg - one boiled; tuna of cold meat or cooked meat - 30 g; Legumes - 1/2 cup or 1 x lentil or soya patty.
Best regards
DietDoc

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: Arup | 2012/10/14

OOHH!! let me get the violins out for these stuipd -|- rags who''ve never heard of condoms and birth control pills! Hold on I''ll be right back You do know people fall pregnant even when using condoms and/or birth control pills, right?

Reply to Arup
Posted by: DietDoc | 2012/10/02

Dear Maria
Adding protein to a cereal product such as chocolate Pronutro will lower the GI of the meal and help to keep your daughter's blood sugar and insulin levels steady for longer which should in turn help her to concentrate for longer, but not for the whole day either. People tend to forget that milk and yoghurt, cheese and cottage cheese, are among the best sources of protein available and on top of that these dairy foods contain our best source of bioavailable calcium. So by adding 1.2 to 1 cup of milk or yoghurt to your daughter's cereal you are already adding protein and lowering the GI of the meal to keep her blood sugar and insulin levels steady for the morning. You can also give her a slice of low-GI bread with a boiled egg, or cheese or peanut butter. All these foods (flavoured milk, yoghurt, cottage cheese, other cheeses, low-GI bread, nuts, raisins, dried fruit, boiled egg, cooked chicken or tuna or cooked legumes (lentils, beans, soya) can be used to make snacks for a child's lunchbox to ensure that their sugar and insulin levels remain steady for the entire school day so that they can perform at their very best. The portion sizes for milk/yoghurt are 1/2 to 1 cup; for cereal 1/2 cup; bread 1-2 slices; other cheeses, dried fruit, peanut butter or other nuts 30 g or 2 tablespoons; egg - one boiled; tuna of cold meat or cooked meat - 30 g; Legumes - 1/2 cup or 1 x lentil or soya patty.
Best regards
DietDoc

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