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Question
Posted by: Johny | 2011/08/11

Bipolar versus Unipolar depression

I read a few interesting articles which stated that the depressive phase of Bipolar disorder (especially BP 2) is quite different than normal Unipolar depression. According to research Bipolar depression is often more atypical and symptoms such as derealisation and depersonification are also more common. With unipolar depression the thinking tends to slow down and patients appear more " sluggish"  which does not often happen with a BP depressive phase.
To complicate matters even more AD''s does not seem to help a BP depressive phase and at its worst it can aggravate the condition, sending the patient into a mixed/manic state or cause rapid cycling. It seems that the cure for BP is indeed mood stabilisers and Atypical anti-psychotics.
I have found with myself that when I take my full dose of AD''s I am aggitated and more prone to panic attacks/derealisation and racing thoughts as when I only take half of my prescribed dosage. The bottom-line is that the mood stabilers and anti-psychotics seem to work much more in my favour than the AD''s. Should I ask my psychiatrist to prescribe a lower dose of AD''s or even ommit it completely from treatment.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I hesitate to use the word "Cure" in medicine over-all. One can quite often achieve useful degrees of control of a condition, rather than curing it.
You raise some very cogent issues, which you need to discuss with your psychiatrist ( remember, guys, even if you have done good research and may be entirely right, doctors don't like being told what to do, so if you can enable them to think something is their idea, they're more likely to go with it !)
Thinking of an old and effective mood stabilizer, Lithium, there is growing evidence that it may be "neuroprotective" protecting and helping brain in Alzheimers, and a number of neurological conditions, and in Bipolar.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2011/08/11

I hesitate to use the word "Cure" in medicine over-all. One can quite often achieve useful degrees of control of a condition, rather than curing it.
You raise some very cogent issues, which you need to discuss with your psychiatrist ( remember, guys, even if you have done good research and may be entirely right, doctors don't like being told what to do, so if you can enable them to think something is their idea, they're more likely to go with it !)
Thinking of an old and effective mood stabilizer, Lithium, there is growing evidence that it may be "neuroprotective" protecting and helping brain in Alzheimers, and a number of neurological conditions, and in Bipolar.

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