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Question
Posted by: Phumlani | 2011/08/10

Beared ingrowth

I am an African male, and everytime after a day or so when I have shaved I grow big strong pimples filled with blood. I will than sqeeze them to eliminate the growing effect. I have tried most of the aftershave creams but the problems persists. Can you suggest something?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageAnti-ageing expert

Hi Phumlani, thank you for the question.

Your best option would be to consult a dermatologist who can examine the skin and give you the correct diagnosis and the best treatment options. From your description it seems you are suffering from a condition known as Pseudofolliculitis barbae which is caused by the hair shaft having a very sharp pointed edge (once the razor has cut the hair) allowing the shaft to grow into the skin leading to a localized infection.

Pseudofolliculitis barbae (PFB) or shaving bumps is a foreign body inflammatory reaction involving papules and pustules. It primarily affects curly haired males who shave.

There are a number of treatment options but these should be discussed with your dermatologist:
A. Chemical depilatories work by breaking the disulfide bonds in hair, which results in the hair being broken off bluntly at the follicular opening:
1. Barium sulfide powder depilatories of about 2% strength can be made into a paste with water and applied to the beard area. This paste is removed after 3-5 minutes.
2. Calcium thioglycolate preparations come as powder, lotions, creams, and pastes. The mercaptan odor is often masked with fragrance. In rare cases, this fragrance can cause an allergic reaction. Calcium thioglycolate preparations take longer to work and are left on 10-15 minutes; chemical burns result if left on too long.
B. Chemical depilatories should not be used every day because they cause skin irritation. Every second or third day is an acceptable regimen. Irritation can be countered by using hydrocortisone cream. A lower pH or concentration, or a different brand, may also prove less irritating. Several products are available; therefore, trying a different product is encouraged if one depilatory proves to be unacceptable.

Topically applied Tretinoin (Retin-A) has shown promise for some patients. When used nightly, it alleviates hyperkeratosis. It may remove the thin covering of epidermis that the hair becomes embedded in upon emerging from the follicle.
Topical combination cream (Tretinoin 0.05%, fluocinolone acetonide 0.01%, and hydroquinone 4%) (Triluma) has been shown to provide some benefit by targeting the hyperkeratosis (Tretinoin), inflammation (fluocinolone), and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (hydroquinone).
Mild topical corticosteroid creams reduce inflammation of papular lesions.

For severe cases of pseudofolliculitis barbae with pustules and abscess formation, topical and oral antibiotics may be indicated. Topical antibiotics may successfully reduce skin bacteria and treat secondary infection. These topicals include erythromycin, clindamycin, and combination clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide (Benzaclin, Duac) and erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide (Benzamycin) agents. Applying one of these agents once or twice per day is effective. Benzoyl peroxide applied topically once a day is also effective in reducing bacterial populations. It should be used sparingly and may be irritating to sensitive skin. It is a good first-line topical agent for persons with oily skin. Benzamycin is a combination of erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide. A once daily application has the benefits of both agents. If pustules or abscess formation is evident, an oral antibiotic is indicated. Tetracycline is a common choice for a systemic antibiotic. Similar to a standard acne regimen, a dose of 500 mg twice a day used initially for 1-3 months is often effective.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: anti-ageing expert | 2011/08/13

Hi Phumlani, thank you for the question.

Your best option would be to consult a dermatologist who can examine the skin and give you the correct diagnosis and the best treatment options. From your description it seems you are suffering from a condition known as Pseudofolliculitis barbae which is caused by the hair shaft having a very sharp pointed edge (once the razor has cut the hair) allowing the shaft to grow into the skin leading to a localized infection.

Pseudofolliculitis barbae (PFB) or shaving bumps is a foreign body inflammatory reaction involving papules and pustules. It primarily affects curly haired males who shave.

There are a number of treatment options but these should be discussed with your dermatologist:
A. Chemical depilatories work by breaking the disulfide bonds in hair, which results in the hair being broken off bluntly at the follicular opening:
1. Barium sulfide powder depilatories of about 2% strength can be made into a paste with water and applied to the beard area. This paste is removed after 3-5 minutes.
2. Calcium thioglycolate preparations come as powder, lotions, creams, and pastes. The mercaptan odor is often masked with fragrance. In rare cases, this fragrance can cause an allergic reaction. Calcium thioglycolate preparations take longer to work and are left on 10-15 minutes; chemical burns result if left on too long.
B. Chemical depilatories should not be used every day because they cause skin irritation. Every second or third day is an acceptable regimen. Irritation can be countered by using hydrocortisone cream. A lower pH or concentration, or a different brand, may also prove less irritating. Several products are available; therefore, trying a different product is encouraged if one depilatory proves to be unacceptable.

Topically applied Tretinoin (Retin-A) has shown promise for some patients. When used nightly, it alleviates hyperkeratosis. It may remove the thin covering of epidermis that the hair becomes embedded in upon emerging from the follicle.
Topical combination cream (Tretinoin 0.05%, fluocinolone acetonide 0.01%, and hydroquinone 4%) (Triluma) has been shown to provide some benefit by targeting the hyperkeratosis (Tretinoin), inflammation (fluocinolone), and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (hydroquinone).
Mild topical corticosteroid creams reduce inflammation of papular lesions.

For severe cases of pseudofolliculitis barbae with pustules and abscess formation, topical and oral antibiotics may be indicated. Topical antibiotics may successfully reduce skin bacteria and treat secondary infection. These topicals include erythromycin, clindamycin, and combination clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide (Benzaclin, Duac) and erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide (Benzamycin) agents. Applying one of these agents once or twice per day is effective. Benzoyl peroxide applied topically once a day is also effective in reducing bacterial populations. It should be used sparingly and may be irritating to sensitive skin. It is a good first-line topical agent for persons with oily skin. Benzamycin is a combination of erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide. A once daily application has the benefits of both agents. If pustules or abscess formation is evident, an oral antibiotic is indicated. Tetracycline is a common choice for a systemic antibiotic. Similar to a standard acne regimen, a dose of 500 mg twice a day used initially for 1-3 months is often effective.

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