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Question
Posted by: rosie | 2012/09/14

Azoospermia - what to do for now?

Hi Dr

My husband (in his forties) recently underwent a semen analysis, which showed he has azoospermia. He had testicular cancer a number of years ago, and one testicle was surgically removed, and he received radiation therapy.

We have made an appointment with a urologist, but it will be some time before we see him. What we would like to know in the mean time, is:

- Is it likely that the cancer or its treatment caused azoospermia?
- Should we do other tests (eg. LH and FSH levels) in the mean time, so that we have these results by the time we see the urologist?
- Are there any " amateur"  tests that can help us to establish the most likely causes of his zero sperm count in the mean time (eg. other symptoms/signs that may make certain causes more likely?)
- How does one go about getting information about sperm donors/ IVF/ ICSI and so forth in SA?
- Do you know of any specialists in the Free State/ Northern Cape/ North West area, who deal with male infertility?

Many thanks
Rosie

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFertility expert

Dear rosie
The fact that your husband has testicular cancer and subsequent radiotherapy would be the most likely cause for his Azoospermia. My guess is that it is most likely that the radio therapy caused the Azoospermia instead if the testicular cancer as the one testis has already been removed. A test that would be helpful to determine whether there is some functionality in the testis would be a FSH, LH level as well as testosterone. This would be helpful in determining whether you have an obstructive or a non-obstructive Azoospermia.a non-obstructive Azoospermia would show very high levels of FSH and LH, as well as low levels of testosterone. Your urologist would most likely perform a testis biopsy to assess if there are any spermatozoa present. If there are any spermatozoa present please advise him to freeze the tissue, as this can be used in a IVF or ICSI procedure by any of the fertility clinics in South Africa.
Answered By: Dr Y.M.Dasoo

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Our users say:
Posted by: fertility expert | 2012/09/28

Dear rosie
The fact that your husband has testicular cancer and subsequent radiotherapy would be the most likely cause for his Azoospermia. My guess is that it is most likely that the radio therapy caused the Azoospermia instead if the testicular cancer as the one testis has already been removed. A test that would be helpful to determine whether there is some functionality in the testis would be a FSH, LH level as well as testosterone. This would be helpful in determining whether you have an obstructive or a non-obstructive Azoospermia.a non-obstructive Azoospermia would show very high levels of FSH and LH, as well as low levels of testosterone. Your urologist would most likely perform a testis biopsy to assess if there are any spermatozoa present. If there are any spermatozoa present please advise him to freeze the tissue, as this can be used in a IVF or ICSI procedure by any of the fertility clinics in South Africa.
Answered By: Dr Y.M.Dasoo

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