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Question
Posted by: Trevor | 2011/03/29

atypical

it seems quite common for psychs to add a low dose ,atypical antipsychotic like Zyprexa to increase efficacy of an antidepressant, in your opinion does this work, have you tried it in your practice, Eglynol in lower doses is used as an antidepressant, so does Zyprexa act as a antidepressant in low doses.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

No, I have not tried these manoeuvres, and I'm not at all convinced that they are backed by adequate good science, rather than hunches perhaps encouraged by the eager marketeers of drug companies. But you are raising a number of somewhat diferent points.
In treating the average ordinary routine depression ( the commonest variety ), I don't think there's the faintest data to suggest there's any value whatever to adding an atypical antipsychotic or anything else to the proper dose of the basic AD. In treatment resistant depression, where several types of AD have been tried for a proper period in a proper dose, one may indeed think of adding something that may act as an adjuvant, which may enhance the antidepressant action of the main Ad being used. Those that might be tried could include a thyroid preparation like Thyroxine, or Lithium, or indeed some antipsychotics in small doses.
I see no value at all ( except to Zyprexa sales ) in adding it as a routine to the routine treatment of routine depression.
Zyprexa is NOT an antidepressant, and if it were significantly so, in small doses, it would be roueinely used ON ITS OWN, to treat depression, and it isn't. Thyroxine has no action as an antidepressant on its own, but can be a useful adjuvant added to an AD in a treatment resistant depression.
Eglonyl is NOT an antidepressant, but this seems a widespread delusion among some SA doctors. As it has very mild benefits in many conditions without being very useful in any of them, I find it's prescription usually suggests a doc who is trying to cover all bets rather than make a proper skilled diagnosis and rather than chosing a true AD to match a proper diagnosis of depression,

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2011/03/29

No, I have not tried these manoeuvres, and I'm not at all convinced that they are backed by adequate good science, rather than hunches perhaps encouraged by the eager marketeers of drug companies. But you are raising a number of somewhat diferent points.
In treating the average ordinary routine depression ( the commonest variety ), I don't think there's the faintest data to suggest there's any value whatever to adding an atypical antipsychotic or anything else to the proper dose of the basic AD. In treatment resistant depression, where several types of AD have been tried for a proper period in a proper dose, one may indeed think of adding something that may act as an adjuvant, which may enhance the antidepressant action of the main Ad being used. Those that might be tried could include a thyroid preparation like Thyroxine, or Lithium, or indeed some antipsychotics in small doses.
I see no value at all ( except to Zyprexa sales ) in adding it as a routine to the routine treatment of routine depression.
Zyprexa is NOT an antidepressant, and if it were significantly so, in small doses, it would be roueinely used ON ITS OWN, to treat depression, and it isn't. Thyroxine has no action as an antidepressant on its own, but can be a useful adjuvant added to an AD in a treatment resistant depression.
Eglonyl is NOT an antidepressant, but this seems a widespread delusion among some SA doctors. As it has very mild benefits in many conditions without being very useful in any of them, I find it's prescription usually suggests a doc who is trying to cover all bets rather than make a proper skilled diagnosis and rather than chosing a true AD to match a proper diagnosis of depression,

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