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Question
Posted by: Scared | 2012/07/20

Anxiety Attacks

Hi Doc

I have been suffering anxiety attacks the last couple of months. I feel shaky, extremely nauseous and panicky. Doctor prescribed Aropax which made me very nauseous so that I couldnt even go to work, and slow release xanor which made me so sleepy. Then he took away the xanor and doubled the aropax to 25mg daily... i was even more nauseous. Then he took me off the aropax and put me on cipralex which also caused nausea, drowsiness, upset stomach and increased anxiety. I have taken myself off this and am taking 0.25mg Alzam twice a day which I know doesnt give me any side effects and acts quickly on the anxiety. Doctor doesnt want me taking alzam as he says it can be habit forming. But surely taking such a low daily dose cant'' cause any harm? By the way he is a GP and not a psychologist.
I feel I should stick with something I know that helps me through the day and that I am able to at least do my job as that has been suffering. I also take 15mg mirteron at night.
Someone suggested tissue salts for the anxiety... what do you know of the success rates on this?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

There are many alternative ways of successfully treating anxiety disorder, and a psychiatrist rather than a GP may be more familiar with them.
Many people are helped by using drugs also used to treat depression, such as Aropax, though we vary in how sensitive we may be to unpeasant side-effects, and may be much better suited by one AD rather than another.
This approach is better than the use of sedative-tranquillizers like valium, ALZAM, Xanor, and others, which can cause dependency problems, and tend to suppress the symptoms without actually improving or alleviating the underlying condition.
In my view the best approach, if you can find ( or if your doc can recommend one )a psychologist skilled with the technique, is CBT, Cognitive-behaviour therapy, a form of talking counselling which has been shown in research to be excellent and teaching you to control anxiety, control or avoid whatever triggers such attacks, and to handle stressful life problems better. Personally, I would usually prefer someone to use this method, perhaps adding whichever antidepressant works for them with minimal side-effects
"Tissue salts", I'm afraid, are pure quackery, and have no proven benefits whatever, other than the general placebo effect that helps us feel a bit better when taking absolutely anything we believe might help us.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/07/21

There are many alternative ways of successfully treating anxiety disorder, and a psychiatrist rather than a GP may be more familiar with them.
Many people are helped by using drugs also used to treat depression, such as Aropax, though we vary in how sensitive we may be to unpeasant side-effects, and may be much better suited by one AD rather than another.
This approach is better than the use of sedative-tranquillizers like valium, ALZAM, Xanor, and others, which can cause dependency problems, and tend to suppress the symptoms without actually improving or alleviating the underlying condition.
In my view the best approach, if you can find ( or if your doc can recommend one )a psychologist skilled with the technique, is CBT, Cognitive-behaviour therapy, a form of talking counselling which has been shown in research to be excellent and teaching you to control anxiety, control or avoid whatever triggers such attacks, and to handle stressful life problems better. Personally, I would usually prefer someone to use this method, perhaps adding whichever antidepressant works for them with minimal side-effects
"Tissue salts", I'm afraid, are pure quackery, and have no proven benefits whatever, other than the general placebo effect that helps us feel a bit better when taking absolutely anything we believe might help us.

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