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Posted by: Sensible | 2010/12/08

Analysis of Dewani case

Dear Prof
Thank you for a brilliant analysis on the Dewani case. It is excellently written with proof of some research made (on the Sabadia case). It is amazing how the moderus operandi in both cases is so similar. Clearly the hijacking stories in both cases were not convincing enough. Shrien Dewani (if he indeed plotted the murder) was not really bright that evening. It seems he already had contacts (maybe prior) with the driver before the " hit"  seeing he is a businessman who was clearly not on his first trip to South Africa. Do you think they arranged the murder well in advance, maybe an earlier trip to South Africa? Anyway, thank you so much for the well research piece.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Thanks for your comments, on my artticle, featured on the News24 front page and surely also within H24
. There is so much more I could write about the Sabadia case... Also, a beautiful, bright and highly talented woman. In that case, the clues that the entire story was phony were screamingly obvious, but only picked up buy the police after hard work by the family and others, including some good journalists, revealing some of the flaws in the silly cover story.
One can't imagine, can one, someone arriving in CT, picking a driver at random, and then at the hotel saying : "Oh, by the way, there's someone I want bumped off - can you recommend a good hitman ? "
One must wonder whether there had been some sort of advance arangements made. Hitmen are just not something ( in my experience, at any rate ) which

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Our users say:
Posted by: anon | 2010/12/19

Media reports say it was his first time visit. His father and family visited SA last December and stayed with friends in the Eastern Cape. But Shrien had never visited SA before.

I was thinking perhaps the woman he had been engaged to had something to do with wanting Anni out of the way. Why did Shrien marry this woman if he wanted her killed? It just doesn''t make any logical sense. It wasn''t an arranged marriage. There was no dowry. He had no life insurance - unless it was only for the travel insurance? Was that an excuse to get rid of her? How much travel insurance did he have and how much cover did he have on her life via travel insurance.

Yes there are many unanswered questions but I still feel that the driver was more involved - he was guilty as sin and as CS so rightly says how many people arrive in the country meet a driver for the first time ask to arrange a hit. Exactly what if the driver had reported it to the police? No there is more to this than meets the eye.

Perhaps it was the family who did not approve of his wedding to this woman who arranged a hit. They had been in the country before, so it would have been easier for them to arrange it, not Shrien.

If the rumours are true that he is secretly gay what would it benefit him to have her killed? Surely having a wife on the side would be more worth his while than having her killed?

The driver was the one who recommended where they go and he was the one to set up the hijacking... it was arranged all right more the crooked driver in cohoots with the other hotel employee who has now also turned state witness - but there is more to this case than meets the eye.

Thank you for your comments and views CS on the Dewani murder.

May her dear soul rest in peace.

If you watch the video the family released this weekend of their dance at their wedding you will notice that Anni looks searchingly into Shrien''s eyes as they dance and there were a few very pensive, sad looking shots the camera captured.

Reply to anon
Posted by: Karen | 2010/12/09

I was wondering does Shrien Dewani not perhaps have " business partners"  in South Africa, and if when last did he visit South Africa or was this his first visit?

Reply to Karen
Posted by: FYA | 2010/12/08

Inside the Dewani case
Last updated: Wednesday, December 08, 2010 Print


As the Dewani case continues to lead the news, the speculation continues. It is unthinkable that someone could organise a hit on his bride - or is it? It will be some time before the truth is clear. While we wait, Cybershrink looks at the basis of the rumours.
Rumours have been flying for weeks about the Dewani murder case. Much about the story seemed from the start to be unconvincing. Now one of the accused, Zola Robert Tongo, driver of their taxi, has implicated the husband, Shrien Dewani, in the murder of his wife of only two weeks, Anni.
A " family friend"  (often a ploy for interested parties to place comments in the media without making themselves accessible to reporters) has said a grieving Dewani denies it all, and is appalled at what he calls the smears and lies.
So many questions
Why anyone would choose to " pursue him with smears and lies"  in this sad situation is a mystery. But then, the whole case has been dogged with mysteries.
Why, for instance, would such a couple decide to visit a venue in a township such as Gugulethu so late at night, long after it would have closed? Why would they not have used the advice and services of the luxury hotel where they were staying, rather than relying on hiring a driver they had just met at the airport, apparently operating in his own time?
Why would hijackers set free the local driver, who would be most likely to be able to identify them? And why release unharmed the husband, also able to identify them and to sound the alarm? Why would hijackers dump a vehicle –  or, if they were looking for money, why not keep the woman and attempt to negotiate a ransom? Why would they take care to harm nobody else but murder the woman –  guaranteed to attract maximum attention, pursuit and eventual sentences?
And, finally, what role did the reputation of South Africa itself play - is it significant, that South Africa is assumed to be a place where it is cheap and easy to arrange a hit, and police can be expected to bungle the case?
Why the husband seemed so suspicious from the first
Dewani is reported to have made inconsistent and conflicting statements on the night of the murder. Perhaps he was in shock. But it was hard to see why a suddenly and newly bereaved groom would so rapidly leave South Africa and remain overseas where, despite his claims to be anxious to help, he was useless to the police enquiries. He did not even attend the identity parade at which he could have identified the men who allegedly murdered his bride. And very few of us in such a situation would promptly hire a major publicist, either. Or even a lawyer. And neither the publicist nor the lawyer, who has since resigned, seems inclined to explain why he was compelled to absent himself from the country while his wife''s case was at such a crucial stage.
… And why the driver also seems suspicious
What sounds less than credible in the driver''s story is the claim that he took the couple from the airport to their hotel, and that the husband asked him then and there to arrange a hit. Wouldn''t that be rash and risky? What if the driver had reported him? Was there something more going on? This is like asking the hotel concierge for contact details for a good tailor, restaurant, and hit man.
… And why the police seem not suspicious enough
In a case like this with so many odd features, why did police allow the husband to leave the country so rapidly, and then announce outright that he was not a suspect? Only when all the evidence has been placed before the court, should that become clear.
Remember the Sabadia case?
The case reminds me of the awful murder of the young Medunsa medical student Zaheeda Sabadia, by " hijackers"  acting on the instructions of her husband, the grisly psychiatrist Dr Sabadia. Dr Sabadia and his private practice were under investigation by various authorities for irregularities in regard to Medical Aid, and there was suspicion that he might be seriously in debt. He recruited patients under treatment by him and his partner to arrange a fake hijacking, and to murder his young wife, apparently for the life insurance. He, too, told a most unconvincing story of how this happened, including the claim that the kidnappers pushed him out of the car and sped off with his wife, who was later found dead. He claimed to have been injured by the criminals, but only his partner corroborated this  and he was unavailable to help the police in their inquiries early on, having been admitted to hospital where his partner insisted for some time that he was not fit to answer questions.
Very similar questions arose as in this case: why would hijackers push the husband out of the car unharmed and only drive off with the wife, and then kill her? Why, indeed, would hijackers not take the car?
In the present case, too, there have been stories of the husband being in major financial difficulties, and standing to benefit financially from his wife''s death.
Dr Sabadia is still in prison, serving a sentence of 50 years. If there is any truth in the driver’ s claims of Dewani’ s involvement, that must be a frightening thought for Dewani.
(Prof M.A. Simpson, Cybershrink, December 2010)
Read more:
Visit our Cybershrink says section to read his analyses of previous events that have made the news headlines.

Reply to FYA
Posted by: Curious | 2010/12/08

Where is the piece so that we can also read it.

Reply to Curious
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/12/08

Thanks for your comments, on my artticle, featured on the News24 front page and surely also within H24
. There is so much more I could write about the Sabadia case... Also, a beautiful, bright and highly talented woman. In that case, the clues that the entire story was phony were screamingly obvious, but only picked up buy the police after hard work by the family and others, including some good journalists, revealing some of the flaws in the silly cover story.
One can't imagine, can one, someone arriving in CT, picking a driver at random, and then at the hotel saying : "Oh, by the way, there's someone I want bumped off - can you recommend a good hitman ? "
One must wonder whether there had been some sort of advance arangements made. Hitmen are just not something ( in my experience, at any rate ) which

Reply to cybershrink

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