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Posted by: DH | 2013/01/16

Amplats closing 4 of its mines

Now here is a thought, NUM and the other unions should buy the mines and run them as they see fit.

- Come on AHoles show the entire world how it should be done.

Of course Sello could just buy them...

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Posted by: DH | 2013/01/17

I doubt it, if that as the case the strikes would have been more widespread.

If they were to nationalize the mines that would do so while thee mines are fully operational. It doesn''t make sense to cripple the mines and then nationalize them. The Cape Twon farm strikes are actually a very small number of people.

The problem lies with the unions. The unions push the strikes but take no responsibility for the repurcussions. I am yet to see a union that adds any value to a workers life.

Reply to DH
Posted by: jo | 2013/01/17

Lol sorry the mines.

Besides the farm strikes, making Western cape ungovernable. But what if it were to make land grabs more - how you say spoken about?

It seems that things are getting worse and worse by the day.

Reply to jo
Posted by: jo | 2013/01/17

I read a comment on news24 that said basically that what if all this happened to actually get what everyone wanted (anc) nationalize the minds?

Made sense and well played.

Reply to jo
Posted by: Big C | 2013/01/17

as an ex Pomm who grew up in the 70s and 80s I remember the coal mine strikes of the late 70s and 80s and Thatcher while hard was 100% correct. Mine our own coal and have to put up with major union shit or close the coal mines and buy it from South America at half the price...guess what happpened?

Reply to Big C
Posted by: DH | 2013/01/17

I think that it is actually easier to do for large corporates like Anglo. They mothball their South African operations and concentrate on Austria until this lot settles down.

The problem with the farms is that the crops are linked to climate. The other thing is that many of the smaller wine farms are trying to establish a name in the international market. It is said that it takes up to 5 years to become productive in the wine farming industry. It is also not an industry that lends itself to a reat deal of mechanization.

I just think that the unions should focus on finding solutions by working together with employers rather than fueling strikes. What is the point of striking for higher wages and in so doing crippling the business to such a degree that it ends up having to shut down. It is like the arms of the body saying that they don''t get enough blood so they will be immobile until the the brain forces the heart to dedicate more blood to the arms. Great plan for a day or two but when the body is no longer able to feed itself the entire body dies (not just the brain)

Reply to DH
Posted by: Big C | 2013/01/17

I can see a lot more mines closing...the gold,platinum , etc aint going anywhere rather close now and open up again in 5 or 10 years when the labor situation is more settled.

Same with the farmers its a simple calculation...I have a farm (hypothetical) its costs me X amount to farm fruit, wine and for this I need 1000 seasonal workers and I make X profit. And now I am getting union shit and violent strikes

Or

I have a farm (hypothetical) I change the crop I grow to one less labor intensive and can be harvested with machinery. I need 20 seasonal workers and I make the same profit.

I know which one I wuld chose.

Reply to Big C
Posted by: Sello | 2013/01/17

DH - me and stupidity is like a set of a raliway line. We run paralell and we will never meet.

Reply to Sello
Posted by: DH | 2013/01/16

Sello - you''re not such a stupid fellow after all hey!!

Reply to DH
Posted by: Sello | 2013/01/16

The issue of the mines forms an intrinsic part of the land debate. If you follow the politics of the country you will realise that the land issue has always been a foremost motivator of the liberation struggle. Although it appears that Julius Malema is out of favour, he is still admired by many for having brough the mine and land issues high on the ANC agenda. These revelations are nothing but a culmination of that debate. In terms of Amplats long term strategic vision, their mining interest in Africa will diminish and they will focus on their assets which are located elsewhere outside Africa. The reason for the closure of its four mine shafts is part of this stratergy. Ofcourse it comes at a point of what the media terms as " wild cat mine''s strikes"  Fair eneough we didnt expect a better terminology from the media. DH i hope you understand this whole story but let me give it to you. Amplats is not closing those mines permanelntly. They are simply putting a hold on its operations for now. Amplats has however denied that the temporal closure is linked to the recent strikes but has blamed unprofitability as the demand for platinum has weakened. What we in the ANC are saying is that, Amplats should surrender licenses of these mine shafts and they must be put on sale so that a new investor are found. To leave these mine shaft idle is a greater opportunity cost to the country. We need to extract that value. There is a lot of money waiting to enter our shores and yes some is from China. China capital is our leverage and this does not go down well with Europe including Amplats. With deals from China we are able to negotiate substantial BBBEE stakes etc. By the way DH i am not interested in buying platinum mines that i leave to others my interest is in salt mining in the W Cape. Get your facts right china otherwise jy gaan seer kry

Reply to Sello

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