advertisement
Question
Posted by: Ann | 2010/06/25

Alcoholic or not?

I don''t know whether to call my mother an ALCOHOLIC OR NOT. She used to work as a nurse but not she has retired. She is 62 years of age. She used to drink at work. She''s been on and off sick. The last time she was sick she was hospitalised for 2 weeks, they had to drain water from the lungs. 2 weeks ago she sick and couldn''t even come out of the bed. They told me that she seemed confused and guess what she''s back on the booze again while stil on medication. The painful part of all of this is that we can''t talk to her, she doesn''t want to listen. if you talk to her she just drops the phone on your ear and the next time you call her she''s not picking it up. How do you talk to someone like that? Even my brother is not talking to her. Last she took my brother (23) to the doctor and as usual she was drunk and he embrassed her in front of everyone there, talking about a lot of things, some didn''t make sense. Even the doctor got pissed off and left. It''s like this booze is making her crazy, she doesn''t seem normal when she''s drunk? What can we do?

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Sounds like a complex situation in an unhappy woman. Alcohol causes its own problems, and other problems when combined with various meds ; habitual drunkenness leads to self-neglect which plays into a whole range of other health problems. And if she is used to a significant regular intake of alcohol, any situation ( like hospital admission ) in which she is suddenly deprived of that alcohol, whether totally or relatively, can cause withdrawal problems, too.
Many alcoholics / problem-drinkers ( its not really fruitful to debate the exact term to use ) use heavy denial to avoid facing the extent of their self-inflicted problems, and don't want to talk about it. Its unfortunate if she has even been in hospital, but the doctors have apparently not grasped and dealt with this important aspect of her problems.
Unfortunately, there's not much that can be don with an alcohiolic / problem drinker unless and until they face the fact that they Have a problem and that they ARE a problem, and that they need heklp and must sincerely follow p[roper expert advice.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: R | 2010/06/25

Not much you can do, sorry. Had the same problem with my father. In and out of hospital, one injury after the other. They know in the medical field, that they are alcholics, it get noted. The get revered for counciling, you might not know this, but the point is they have to want to go to be helped. Sometimes not even tough love helps.

He passed away last year, everything just stopped working in his body, and in some way I am releaved. No more calls, worrying and hospitals. I believe he found the peace he was looking for all these years in his drinks, but miss him soooo much. But that is a part of my life that made me stronger and tought me a lesson, not a nice one. There is really only soo much you can do and you have to accept it at some stage. The problem is we always think we can help everyone we love, but they still have to want to be helped. Good luck!

Reply to R
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/06/25

Sounds like a complex situation in an unhappy woman. Alcohol causes its own problems, and other problems when combined with various meds ; habitual drunkenness leads to self-neglect which plays into a whole range of other health problems. And if she is used to a significant regular intake of alcohol, any situation ( like hospital admission ) in which she is suddenly deprived of that alcohol, whether totally or relatively, can cause withdrawal problems, too.
Many alcoholics / problem-drinkers ( its not really fruitful to debate the exact term to use ) use heavy denial to avoid facing the extent of their self-inflicted problems, and don't want to talk about it. Its unfortunate if she has even been in hospital, but the doctors have apparently not grasped and dealt with this important aspect of her problems.
Unfortunately, there's not much that can be don with an alcohiolic / problem drinker unless and until they face the fact that they Have a problem and that they ARE a problem, and that they need heklp and must sincerely follow p[roper expert advice.

Reply to cybershrink

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement