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Question
Posted by: Concerned wife | 2010/10/06

ADULT ADD AND CILIFT

I am seriously concerned about my husband (52 yerars) who has shown many many signs of AADD, and many of the symptons are worsening as he struggles to cope! He has finally plucked up the courage to mention this thought to our doctor, who after a 2 minute discussion has put him on Cilift, 10mg, and told him it’ s for depression. I’ m very concerned that the is being mistreated for depression when it in fact I believe it’ s AADD. My daughter had/has ADD but because of the support and treatment we got for her as a child, she has learned the coping skills for her adult life, but I recognize many of the sign in my husband.



I’ ve for many years thought he may have AADD, but he has finally now verbalized this thought himself, which has opened the door for me to try and help him and to get the right help.



Please assist me by guiding me as to where we should go for help/assistance/treatment, as it is adversely affecting our marriage.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

You may or may not be right about the exact nature of your husband's problems, but if there is good reason for concern, and the diagnosis is not absolutely obvious, it is wise NOT to rely on a GP's opinion ( most did not receive much training in psychiatry ) and rather arrange for your husband to be seen by a good local psychiatrist for a detailed expert assessment, and then a discussion of diagnosis and treatment options.
It is always wisest to seek such an expert assessment, rather than making a personal diagnosis and then looking for someone specializing in what you think the problem is.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

3
Our users say:
Posted by: Linus | 2010/10/06

Have him checked out for Aspergers Syndrome while you are about it....

Reply to Linus
Posted by: Woman | 2010/10/06

Adult ADHD is a rather newish medical condition. Many people are only diagnosed when their children are diagnosed. The ADHD gene is carried by the father. If he thinks he has, he probably does. The problem is when you go to an ordinary GP who then prescribes whatever the medical rep told them about. ADHD medications are very hectic and require close monitoring from a psychiatrist who specialises in Adult ADHD. The good ones are rare, but well worth the expense of seeing.

Contact ADHASA and ask them to recommend a specialist near you. It can take years before you find the right mix of medication. In the mean time, you will have to be strong in yourself, and support him all the way. If you see he''s having bad moods, depressed, over stimulated etc, then you must tell him to let his specialist know.

If he''s lived this long with ADHD, he is probably very smart, remember to tell him how proud you are of the way he''s handling the realisation. Having the people they love telling them they''re proud of them, means the world.

My hubby has adult ADHD, it''s not always easy, his meds are still not stable, but we deal with it all as best we can, and we have a wonderful specialist psychiatrist who helps us every step of the way. My hubby feels that concerta is the best medication for him, but every person is unique, and there are many options, depending on the undrlying conditions - Strattera, Ritalin, Wellbutrin, Adderol. ADHD forums ought to give first hand accounts of the meds and their side effects.

Good luck to you , and feel free to ask if you need a shoulder! The partners of ADHD''s are mostly alone, and it can be harrowing some days. (I am sure you know what I''m talking about)

Reply to Woman
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/10/06

You may or may not be right about the exact nature of your husband's problems, but if there is good reason for concern, and the diagnosis is not absolutely obvious, it is wise NOT to rely on a GP's opinion ( most did not receive much training in psychiatry ) and rather arrange for your husband to be seen by a good local psychiatrist for a detailed expert assessment, and then a discussion of diagnosis and treatment options.
It is always wisest to seek such an expert assessment, rather than making a personal diagnosis and then looking for someone specializing in what you think the problem is.

Reply to cybershrink

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