advertisement
Question
Posted by: Hope* | 2011/12/05

ADs

Morning CS. I haven''t been here for quite some time. Hope you''re well. My question is regarding ADs. I managed to wean myself off ad''s last year December and have found no difference it the way I felt taking them as with not taking them except for the feeling of detachment the with the ADs. I now find myself in a very dark and low place again. The feeling has come and gone over the past year but it seems its struck hard this time. My question is  Do you think I was possibly taking the wrong ADs? ...or is it that the numb detached feeling is the desired effect of an AD? Hope I''m making sense?

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I'm not sure I fully undertand what you're saying. If you are now feeling very dark and low again, then there WAS and IS a very real difference between how you were on ADs and off them. One of the main reasons for remaining on them long-term when one has had recurrent episodes of depression is to reduce the risk of further episodes. And maybe, having removed that degree of protection, you have succumbed to a further episode of depression.
When usefully on ADs, they're not about feelign great or even good, but being able to feel more ordinary and not so dominated by one's low moods.
I wouldn;t say that the numb feling is th edesired effect of taking an AD, but may be an aceptable price to pay for the absence of major depressive episodes.
ToMaria, I don't know about "soft bipolar", or whether that's even a useful term. It's a theory, and for progress one needs to come up with theories based on observations of the nature of many people's illnesses and responses to meds and other treatments, to refine diagnoses and definitions.
We must also avoid geting mystified by words. For instance, there's a bunch of drugs we call ADs because they were first used usefully to treat depression. But none of them are specific, and the particula chemical effects they have can be useful, as we later discovered, in a whole range o other conditions. This doesn't mean that everything that responds to what we first called an AD must be depression. Similarly, other forms of ways of being depressed may respond usefully to drugs also used in treating bipolar disorder, without this meaning that they must be a soft or hard version of actual bipolar disorder - most of them were originally developed to treat epilepsy, but that doesn't mean that Bipolar disorder is a form of epilepsy.
Only your psych, if he's been keeping up to date, can most usefully re-assess your condition and which meds, including some more recently available, may be best able to help you.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

3
Our users say:
Posted by: Hope* | 2011/12/05

Thanks CS.

Hello Maria!!!
Its been a long time:)
(((hugs))) to you too.

Reply to Hope*
Posted by: Maria | 2011/12/05

Hello my friend Hope*, long time no chat. I''m sorry to hear you are not doing well at the moment.

I was reading up yesterday on something called " soft bipolar" , actually want to ask CS''s opinion on it. Some health professionals say that it is a state somewhere in between unipolar depression and bipolar 2, and not covered by DSM definitions. AD''s can actually make things worse but mood stabilisers like Lamictin or lithium on their own can be very effective.

(((HUGS)))

Reply to Maria
Posted by: cybershrink | 2011/12/05

I'm not sure I fully undertand what you're saying. If you are now feeling very dark and low again, then there WAS and IS a very real difference between how you were on ADs and off them. One of the main reasons for remaining on them long-term when one has had recurrent episodes of depression is to reduce the risk of further episodes. And maybe, having removed that degree of protection, you have succumbed to a further episode of depression.
When usefully on ADs, they're not about feelign great or even good, but being able to feel more ordinary and not so dominated by one's low moods.
I wouldn;t say that the numb feling is th edesired effect of taking an AD, but may be an aceptable price to pay for the absence of major depressive episodes.
ToMaria, I don't know about "soft bipolar", or whether that's even a useful term. It's a theory, and for progress one needs to come up with theories based on observations of the nature of many people's illnesses and responses to meds and other treatments, to refine diagnoses and definitions.
We must also avoid geting mystified by words. For instance, there's a bunch of drugs we call ADs because they were first used usefully to treat depression. But none of them are specific, and the particula chemical effects they have can be useful, as we later discovered, in a whole range o other conditions. This doesn't mean that everything that responds to what we first called an AD must be depression. Similarly, other forms of ways of being depressed may respond usefully to drugs also used in treating bipolar disorder, without this meaning that they must be a soft or hard version of actual bipolar disorder - most of them were originally developed to treat epilepsy, but that doesn't mean that Bipolar disorder is a form of epilepsy.
Only your psych, if he's been keeping up to date, can most usefully re-assess your condition and which meds, including some more recently available, may be best able to help you.

Reply to cybershrink

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement