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Question
Posted by: Anri | 2012-03-23

ADHD

Prof Simpson

My son (11) is ADHD, or so they say.... Since grade 1 on Ritalin and for the last year on Conserta 36mg. After a discussion with the school teacher we changed the medication to 27 mg. The teacher said he looked " dozed" . i Just dont know where to turn to anymore, because i cant see any difference in his performance, exams etc. In grade 4 he ended with a percentage of 58% which is acceptable for me. But now the first quarter of grade 5 he is catching a major dip. I dont know if my child is ADHD.
How do you determine whether this is lazyness, dissipline problems or a real problem like depression/ bipoler or whatever?
How do a parent decide to keep a child back - not moving to the next grade. I am worried that a decision like this will do more harm than good.
The past view months he is also very aggresive and back chatting and difficult to handle.(And he is not even a teenager yet......)
He is not writing down his homework and do not understand the importance to do well (your best). It is if he dont care.

Take note that he is seeing a psigiatrist every 6 months and previously visit a Child Neurologist - Dr Michael Lippert. Had two EEG scans to check for epilepsy. Had a brain scan as well after the first EEG.
He had an IQ test at a psygologist and everything is fine.

We cannot afford to put him in an ADHD school.

I dont think he is doing that bad at school. It is just that he is not interested at all. And that scares me.

Any suggestions?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I understand your concern. I find the child's problems are rarely due entirely to ADHD or to behaviour difficulties, but often some of both, and thus needing intervention on all aspects of the difficulties.
The child neurologist is likely to have made a sensible diagnosis, and as that was apparently confirmed by the psychiatrist, it should be reliable. Maybe have the psychiatrist do a review and discuss the current situation with you.
Maria's comments are useful, as ever ( and remind one of the importance of not losing one's marbles !) - and exemplifies the sort of behavioural approach that can be very helpful in all behaviour problems. On the issue of taking the meds, I suppose it is certain that he is taking the prescribed meds as prescribed ? One common cause of meds not working, is that the individual not actually taking them. As a picky eater, maybe he's changed his mind about the pills ?
Though there are differing attitudes to the ADHD drugs ( and drugs which aren't working need to be carefully stopped ) taking them has NOTHING whatever to do with meth or meth addiction.
A child psychologist could help a lot, including planning how to persuade him to eat what he needs to eat

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Mom to be | 2012-03-30

Hi Lizelle, yes it definately worked for him, she initially only started with the focus formula and added the brightspark a few weeks later. She says the two works excellent together and won''t use the one without the other. The nice thing about these products is that you can use a few of them together, with " normal"  medicine that is always risky.

Reply to Mom to be
Posted by: Lizelle | 2012-03-30

Hi Mom to be - did these products work for the girl''s son - I am trying this now as well and am waiting for it to arrive - hopefuly today or on Monday, because the school also wants me to put my 9yr son on Ritalin. Told them that I''m going to try this first, and she immediately - indirectly - said that no herbal product will work - but I''m going to try it anyway. Tx

Reply to Lizelle
Posted by: Mom to be | 2012-03-28

A girl who works with me also had to put her son on conserta. She decided to rather try the products for ADHD from
www dot feelgoodhealth dot co dot za because she was also concerned about the effect of conserta on her son (dozed etc.)

search under children for the products available

They also have feedback from othe parents which might be helpfull.

Reply to Mom to be
Posted by: Anri | 2012-03-24

Thanks for the advice. I am really worried now. But how do you make a child eat something that he don''t even want to taste, before he decide he don''t like it?
Thanks again.

Reply to Anri
Posted by: question | 2012-03-24

Anri, I am not all all surprised to hear this. I am no professional, but I can tell you that I think this is certainly the root of the problem!

At 11 years he is definitely old enough to understand the concept of:" if I eat these foods and drink these vitamins and minerals, I will do better, feel better and life will be great"  and you, as his parent can certainly enforce (if necessary) a diet change so that your child can live a long and healthy life.

Please please consult a dietitian and have those tests done (on allergies and food sensitivities) and let her work out a healthy diet for him. At the moment, the chances are great that you are giving your child very strong brain chemistry altering chemicals, possibly without really needing to. Isn''t the though t that you might be giving a normal child METH a hell of a scary thought?And who knows what damage that may do? (i saw those pictures of meth addicts, have you?)

Reply to question
Posted by: Anri | 2012-03-24

Thanks Maria. I''ve tried the reward system when he was younger. I used black dot stickers and smiley faces. It just don''t have the same effect any more.

@ question. Yes his diet. Is a mess. He is a very bad and pecky eater. Even vitamin pills make him nauseas. Don''t know how to. Change this. And he is on antehistamine as well for allergies.

Reply to Anri
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012-03-24

I understand your concern. I find the child's problems are rarely due entirely to ADHD or to behaviour difficulties, but often some of both, and thus needing intervention on all aspects of the difficulties.
The child neurologist is likely to have made a sensible diagnosis, and as that was apparently confirmed by the psychiatrist, it should be reliable. Maybe have the psychiatrist do a review and discuss the current situation with you.
Maria's comments are useful, as ever ( and remind one of the importance of not losing one's marbles !) - and exemplifies the sort of behavioural approach that can be very helpful in all behaviour problems. On the issue of taking the meds, I suppose it is certain that he is taking the prescribed meds as prescribed ? One common cause of meds not working, is that the individual not actually taking them. As a picky eater, maybe he's changed his mind about the pills ?
Though there are differing attitudes to the ADHD drugs ( and drugs which aren't working need to be carefully stopped ) taking them has NOTHING whatever to do with meth or meth addiction.
A child psychologist could help a lot, including planning how to persuade him to eat what he needs to eat

Reply to cybershrink
Posted by: Maria | 2012-03-23

Also consider sending him to a good child psychologist, they can work wonders.

Reply to Maria
Posted by: question | 2012-03-23

Have you ever had his diet evaluated with a dietitian? It is said that children who become like zombies on methylphenedate are not necessarily ADHD, but possibly have some dietary problem - like the ability to absorb vit. B and also sensitivity to certain foods- tartrazine, msg etc.

Reply to question
Posted by: Maria | 2012-03-23

My 9 year old has 2 jars with marbles. There are certain things she must remember to do and if she does them without prompting, she earns a marble. Then there are things that will cause her to lose a marble, like bringing home a school bag with papers stuffed in all over instead of neatly filed where they should be. When she accumulates 10 marbles she gets a reward. If she wants to save up to 20, the reward is bigger. Have you tried something like that? Rewards for good behaviour and results, unpleasant consequences for bad results?

If the Concerta makes no difference I would stop giving it. Perhaps experiment at the start of next term and don''t give him the pills but don''t tell the teacher. Then if you haven''t heard anything from her after a week, ask her if she could tell he wasn''t taking the meds.

Reply to Maria

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