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Question
Posted by: Gran | 2012/08/29

4-year old too hyperactive

My grandson is too hyper I''''m now concerned if something is wrong with him. He would be sleeping, by when woken up it''''s like he never slept at all.

He''''s very disruptive in creche the reports are endless.
Just recently he was being naughty in class and a teacher pinched him in the ear. Apparently he pinched the teacher back. His reason being he wanted the teacher to feel the pain as well. When reprimanded by his mother later at home, he also pinched her, then asked her if that was sore. When she said yes, he said, "  exactly that''''s how I felt and that''''s why I pinched teacher so she can also feel the pain so that she doesn''''t do it again.

At one stage his teacher advised that we don''''t give him sweets, but he doesn''''t even like sweets. You give him a loll/sweet he will just lick it and give it back to you saying its too sweet. Things that come out of his mouth you''''d swear he''''s 10 years old.

At the beginning of the year we thought it was a language problem, because he was coming from an all IsiXhosa speaking environmnet to English medium one. Now he only wants to speal English even to his friends at home, who don''''t even understand what he says. I once overheard him another child in an aggressive tone while playing saying, "  You must listen when I talk to you, otherwise there''''s going to be trouble. Meanwhile, the poor child had no idea what was beind said.

Should we be worried?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Its important to be sure what we're talking about, and what we are assuming to be the boundaries of normal. Is he hyperactive ? Or just active ? Compared with whom ? If he's disruptive in class, that's usually a disciplinary proble, rather than one needing meds.
Frankly, I applaud the kid for pinching the teacher back - for her to have pinched him was improper conduct for someone supposed to be an educator, and technically an assault. He was making a highly valid poiont, which apparently neither the teacher nor his mother bothered to understand.
The advice to avoid sweets sounds like the teacher is assuming he might be suffering from ADHD, and is giving inappropriate health advice - she is not qualified to make such a diagnosis or to advice on its management - at most, she can alert a parent to the POSSIBILITY that this might be a child's problem, for it to be checked out by an appropriate expert.
The comment you overheard suggests he could be imitating the authoritarian and bullying tone of his teacher as its highly unlikely and child would come up with such comments spontaneously and entirely on his own.
Preferring English, well, maybe he associates it with higher status or just wants to practice it as much as possible to do better in it, at school.
If you have several reasons to be concerned he might have ADHD, a paediatician might be able to help, but a child psychologist would be the best person to assess him, as he/she could also consider disciplinary problems should these exist, and advise the child, and the parents and yourself about the best sort of disciplinary program to adopt to help him learn to be better behaved on issues where it really counts.

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: Liza | 2012/08/31

Your grandson doesn''t sound hyperactive. He sounds like an extremely intelligent 4 year old who''s probably utterly bored with the simple things they teach in the creche. His teacher also sounds like a rather dim-witted individual who will never be able to stimulate your grandson intellectually the way he needs to be.

A child psychologist will be able to tell you whether your grandson is the problem - or whether the teacher is the one wanting a kid with superior intelligence to be the same as kids with average intelligence. Personally I think it''s the teacher. Pinching the boy was way out of line and him pinching her back just shows that he''s more intelligent than she is! An intelligent teacher would never need to pinch a student!

Good Luck
Liza

Reply to Liza
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/08/29

Its important to be sure what we're talking about, and what we are assuming to be the boundaries of normal. Is he hyperactive ? Or just active ? Compared with whom ? If he's disruptive in class, that's usually a disciplinary proble, rather than one needing meds.
Frankly, I applaud the kid for pinching the teacher back - for her to have pinched him was improper conduct for someone supposed to be an educator, and technically an assault. He was making a highly valid poiont, which apparently neither the teacher nor his mother bothered to understand.
The advice to avoid sweets sounds like the teacher is assuming he might be suffering from ADHD, and is giving inappropriate health advice - she is not qualified to make such a diagnosis or to advice on its management - at most, she can alert a parent to the POSSIBILITY that this might be a child's problem, for it to be checked out by an appropriate expert.
The comment you overheard suggests he could be imitating the authoritarian and bullying tone of his teacher as its highly unlikely and child would come up with such comments spontaneously and entirely on his own.
Preferring English, well, maybe he associates it with higher status or just wants to practice it as much as possible to do better in it, at school.
If you have several reasons to be concerned he might have ADHD, a paediatician might be able to help, but a child psychologist would be the best person to assess him, as he/she could also consider disciplinary problems should these exist, and advise the child, and the parents and yourself about the best sort of disciplinary program to adopt to help him learn to be better behaved on issues where it really counts.

Reply to cybershrink

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