28 December 2010

A typical daily intake

Here is an example of what a person eats on a typical day.


In dietician Karen Protheroe’s book entitled “The Lean Aubergine”, there is an interesting reference to a client who had visited Karen since she was struggling to lose weight and yet was convinced that she was making healthy dietary choices. Here is a typical day’s intake.

An average day

(Fat content in grams)


1 cup crunchy muesli (22.6)

1 cup 2% milk (4.8)

Mid-morning snack

1 cup coffee with 2% milk & sweetener (1.4)

1 muesli rusk (5)


2 slices whole-wheat bread (1.5)

cheese & margarine for sandwich (21.5)

tomato for sandwich (0)

1 small tub (175ml) low-fat yoghurt (1.9)

1 banana (0)

Mid-afternoon snack

2 cups home-made popcorn (7)

2 cups coffee with 2% milk & sweetener (2.9)

1 health bar (e.g. yoghurt or seed bar) (17.4)


90g roast chicken (12.2)

2 tbsp. gravy (15.6)

1 medium baked potato (0.1)

butter on potato (8.2)

cauliflower cheese (9.9)

Greek salad with French dressing (19.3)

¼ avocado (5.8)

Evening snack

3 bran biscuits (8.9)

½ cup nuts (4.1)

2 cups coffee with 2% milk & sweetener (2.9)

TOTAL FAT CONTENT = 206.6g (whereas it should be about 40-70g) 

(Extracted from registered dietician Karen Protheroe’s book, entitled The Lean Aubergine.)

How does your diet rate compared to this? Most people should strive to take in between 40 to 70g of fat per day, with only 4 – 7g of this fat coming from saturated fats – no more.

Yet on analysis of this diet, the client was found to be consuming far in excess of her daily fat requirement, hence her weight problem. From the table above, it is clear to see what foods should have been avoided.

(If you would like to purchase a copy of The Lean Aubergine - A South African Guide to Low Fat Shopping, Cooking and Eating Out send an email to

(The Lean Aubergine Dietetic Services, Health24, December 2010)


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