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Nutrition basics

The WHO blames too much sugar for many lifestyle diseases

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), reducing your daily free sugar intake to less than 10% of your total energy intake will significantly reduce your risk of becoming overweight, obese and developing tooth decay.

Lack of food security a threat to us all

A bit of maize-meal porridge, brown bread and tea with milk and sugar. That does not sound too bad, right? Unless this is all you have to eat all day, every day.

Eat Mediterranean, live longer

Keen to eat like the Greeks and to reap the benefits, too? Here’s a handy shopping list to help you stock up on those Mediterranean essentials.

Latest comment on Health24

Garth Whittle says...

Ben, I must agree with you. Unfortunately there are too many people cry 'ban it' purely because the don't and probably never will, understand it. 11-year-old boy goes blind from laser light
Why your body needs sugar

Our bodies all need sugar (or glucose) to function, which in my mind is why we all should eat sugar, or at least foods that convert into sugar, writes registered dietitian Kim Hoffmann.

Craving sugar? Blame your brain

A mechanism that appears to sense how much glucose is reaching the brain and prompts animals to seek more if it detects a shortfall may play a role in driving our preference for sweet and starchy foods.

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