30 August 2011

Weight loss without hunger

Losing weight without a grumbling stomach or an expensive liquid diet can be as simple as eating a lighter lunch.


Losing weight without a grumbling stomach or expensive liquid diet can be as simple as eating a lighter lunch, finds a new Cornell University study to be published in the issue of the Journal Appetite.

Participants who ate portion-controlled lunches did not compensate by eating more kilojoules later in the day, leading researchers to believe the human body does not possess the mechanisms necessary to notice a small drop in energy intake.

"Making small reductions in energy intake to compensate for the increasing number of calories available in our food environment may help prevent further weight gain, and one way of doing this could be to consume portion-controlled lunches a few times a week," said doctoral student Carly Pacanowski, who co-authored the study with David Levitsky, Cornell professor of nutritional sciences and of psychology.

The study closely monitored the food intake of 17 volunteers who ate whatever they wanted from a buffet for one week. For the next two weeks, half the group selected their lunch by choosing from one of six commercially available, portion-controlled foods, such as Chef Boyardee Pasta or Campbell's Soup at Hand, but could eat as much as they wished at other meals or snacks. For the final two weeks, the other half of volunteers followed the same regimen.

While eating portion-controlled lunches, each participant consumed 1050 fewer kilojoules per day and lost, on average, 0.5 kg

"The results confirm that humans do not regulate energy intake with any precision. Over a year, such a regimen would result in losing at least 11 kg," said Levitsky, who adds the study demonstrates one simple, low-cost way to consume fewer kilojoules.

(EurekAlert, August 2011) 

Read more:

Weight loss

Diet and nutrition


Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Exercise benefits for seniors »

Working out in the concrete jungle Even a little exercise may help prevent dementia Here’s an unexpected way to boost your memory: running

Seniors who exercise recover more quickly from injury or illness

When sedentary older adults got into an exercise routine, it curbed their risk of suffering a disabling injury or illness and helped them recover if anything did happen to them.