02 June 2014

Could white bread be making you fat?

People who eat mainly white bread are more likely to have weight problems than those who prefer whole wheat bread.


If you're watching your weight, you may have to watch your white bread consumption, too.

When white bread is a diet staple, you may be more likely to become overweight or obese than if you favour whole grain bread, according to a new study.

Researchers tracked the eating habits and weight of more than 9 200 Spanish university graduates for an average of five years.

Read: White vs. brown

Participants who ate both white and whole grain breads were not at increased risk for weight gain. But those who ate only white bread and had two or more portions of white bread a day were 40% more likely to become overweight or obese than those who ate less than one portion of white bread a week, according to the study authors.

Types of carbohydrates

There was no significant link between eating whole grain bread only and becoming overweight or obese. This may be because of the types of carbohydrates, fibre content and other ingredients in whole grain bread, according to Miguel Martinez-Gonzalez, a professor at the University of Navarra in Spain, and colleagues.

"Consumption of white bread [of] two portions per day or more showed a significant direct association with the risk of becoming overweight or obese," they concluded.

The study was scheduled for presentation at the European Congress on Obesity in Bulgaria. The research doesn't actually show a cause-and-effect relationship between white bread consumption and weight gain, just an association. And study results presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

Read more:
Top tips to downsize your portions
Under-sized loaves seized

Bread wheat's complex genome revealed

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Exercise benefits for seniors »

Working out in the concrete jungle Even a little exercise may help prevent dementia Here’s an unexpected way to boost your memory: running

Seniors who exercise recover more quickly from injury or illness

When sedentary older adults got into an exercise routine, it curbed their risk of suffering a disabling injury or illness and helped them recover if anything did happen to them.