advertisement
13 September 2012

Chicken warning for SA consumers

Consumers have been warned about the incorrect labelling of some frozen chicken products sold across the country.

0

Consumers were warned on Wednesday about the incorrect labelling of some frozen chicken products sold across the country.

The health department said the warning applied to frozen chicken portions, also referred to as "Individually Quick Frozen (IQF)" chicken portions.

"The description fails to inform the consumer that the product purchased by them is a composite foodstuff, consisting of chicken portions to which the processor added a brine-based mixture or solution," health spokesman Fidel Radebe said.

The brine-based mixture consisted of water, salt and food additives, including thickeners and flavourants, and was injected into the chicken portions. Hadebe said in some cases the percentage of the brine-based mixture added to the chicken portions was as high as 30%, of which 29% was water.

He said this negatively affected quality from a nutritional perspective, and increased the amount of salt present. Incorrect, or sometimes absent, labelling on the products was not a food safety issue.

"It is considered important that consumers are made aware of the situation regarding the actual contents of these products and to thus allow them the opportunity to use their discretion when purchasing these products."

(Sapa, September 2012)

Read more: 

Snacks pose cancer risk to SA

Food crunch in SA

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Wasting water? »

South Africa is facing a water crisis Water saving tips Water quality report shocks

SEE: How much water do you use per day?

With level 4 water restrictions in Cape Town, residents are urged to use a maximum of 100 litres per person per day. Here’s how quickly it adds up.

Life saving tip! »

SEE: 10 things to keep in your first aid kit 10 first aid myths

Here's why you need a first aid kit in the car

Emergency services are often spread thin, especially when storms and major disasters strike. When travelling on the road, having a well-stocked first aid kit could be a lifesaver.