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Updated 02 February 2013

Brine levels in chicken too high

The government wants to reduce the levels of brine found in chicken, according to a report.

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The government wants to reduce the levels of brine found in chicken, according to a report. The Business Day reported that chicken sold in South Africa contained excessive amounts of brine, which could have health implications.

Brine is a salt solution used to enhance the texture and flavour of frozen chicken.

The Department of Agriculture has drafted changes to the Agricultural Product Standards Act aimed at reducing the level of brine in chicken to 4%.

No control over brine levels

David Wolpert, chief executive of the Association of Meat Importers and Exporters of South Africa told the publication brine levels in chicken were as high as 30%.

There is no legislation controlling the percentage of brine but many countries prohibit it and the United States allows 12%.

Preliminary results of a study by the department found that there were high sodium concentrations in local chicken, which presented health risks.

(Sapa, July 2012)

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