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Updated 12 April 2013

Pistachios

Pistachios are rich in potassium, phosphorus and magnesium.

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Pistachios are rich in potassium (helps regulate the body's fluid balance), phosphorus (helps build bones and teeth) and magnesium (important element in the conversion of the body's energy), and are also a good source of vitamin B6 (aids protein metabolism and absorption) and thiamine (enhances energy and promotes normal appetite).

These nuts also have a relatively low calorie value when compared to other nuts and are cholesterol free, high in fibre and low in saturated fat.

These nuts are also a very good source of protein.

Like most other nuts, pistachios can also cut heart disease risk. The high monounsaturated fat content may actually lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Pistachios also contain antioxidants in the form of phytochemicals. These plant nutrients have been associated with a decreased risk for developing chronic diseases, like cancer.

To reduce the sodium and fat content of your diet, avoid salted, oil-roasted pistachio nuts.

Let these nuts form part of a healthy, balanced diet: sprinkle the pistachios on yoghurt, hot or cold cereal, or in cream cheese spreads for sandwiches and crackers. Add chopped pistachios to your favourite bread, pancake, waffle or muffin recipe or snack on them between meals.

Pistachio nuts have a high monounsaturated fat and protein content. Don't eat more than 30 nuts (18 g) more than four times a week. To avoid piling on those kilos, substitute other high fat foods with pistachios – don't just add them on to your diet.

Calories 567
Total fat 46 g
Protein 21 g
Carbohydrate 27 g
Fibre 10 g
Vitamin B6 1,7 mg
Thiamine 0,8 mg
Potassium 1 033 mg
Selenium 8 mcg

Per 100 g

 
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