10 January 2011

A week of sport controversy

So.... Oscar Pistorius didn’t make the cut. Can’t say I’m surprised.


So.... Oscar Pistorius didn’t make the cut. Can’t say I’m surprised. We're all enchanted by the triumph of spirit over adversity that he represents, but really... Did anyone else raise their eyebrows on hearing thatPistorius only started training for the Olympics with seven weeks to go?

If seven weeks were enough to get one into Olympic form, top athletes would have an easy life. They could laze most of the year away in hammocks eating bon-bons. Other wannabe Olympians have been working at it all year – especially if they were marginal anyway (Oscar’s best time has never made the cut).

In an interview with Health24 in May, FitnessDoc Dr Ross Tucker, explained why he believes Pistorius should not have been given the go-ahead. His argument is pretty scientific. Well, he’s a scientist. But even a non-scientist could tell, looking at Pistorius in the line-ups before the race starts, that he’s been putting in less gym time than those he’s competing against. From the hips up, he should be pretty much on a par with the rest. But he’s a lot softer. I don’t know what conclusions you draw...

On the subject of sporting disappointments, we’re sad that Team Barloworld, the SA-sponsored team in the Tour de France, has been implicated in drugging. In a police raid on the team’s hotel, banned substances were found in Moises Duenas Nevando’s room (you’re right, it’s not a good South African name: he’s Spanish), and he was arrested. Barloworld’s team manager has made all the right noises of shock and horror (has no-one told him the meaning of the word ‘team’?). By this stage we’re all a bit ho-hum about drugs and the Tour, but it’s still disappointing.

(Heather Parker, Health24, July 2008)




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